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Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language instruction. She also has an interest in the development of literacy and in language processing.

From a theoretical perspective, Liz has recently become interested in whether human language may be understood in terms of discriminative learning — a well-understood theory of learning developed in the study of animal learning. This work is funded by a grant from the Leverhulme Trust.

See also https://languagelearninglab-ox.com/

Publications
  • Dong H, Clayards M, Brown H, Wonnacott E. 2019. The effects of high versus low talker variability and
    individual aptitude on phonetic training of Mandarin lexical tones. PeerJ 7:e7191 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.7191
  • Sinkeviciute, R., Brown, H., Brekelmans, G., & Wonnacott, E. (2019) The role of input variability and learner
    age in second language vocabulary learning. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 1-26.
  • Samara, A., Singh, D., & Wonnacott, E. (2018) Statistical learning and spelling: Evidence from an incidental
    learning experiment with children. Cognition, 182, 25-30. DOI 10.1016
  • Amridge, B., Barak, L., Wonnacott, E., Bannard, C., & Sala, G. (2018) Effects of Both Preemption and Entrenchment in the Retreat from Verb Overgeneralization Errors: Four Reanalyses, an Extended Replication, and a Meta-Analytic Synthesis. Collabra: Psychology, 4(1), 23.
  • Giannakopoulou, A., Brown, H., Clayards, M., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) High or Low? Comparing high and low-variability phonetic training in adult and child second language learners. PeerJ 5:e3209; DOI 10.7717/peerj.3209
  • Wonnacott, E., Brown, H., & Nation, K. (2017) Skewing the evidence: The effect of input structure on child
    and adult learning of lexically-based patterns in an artificial language. Journal of Memory and Language, 95, 46-48. 10.1016/j.jml.2017.01.005 Rcode data
  • Samara, A. Smith, K., Brown, H., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Acquiring variation in an artificial language:
    children and adults are sensitive to socially-conditioned linguistic variation. Cognitive Psychology, 94, 85-114
  • Smith, K., Perfors, A., Fehér, O., Samara, A., Swoboda, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2017) Language learning,
    language use and the evolution of linguistic variation. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B, 372(1711), 20160051.
  • Fehér, O., Wonnacott, E., & Smith, K. (2016) Structural priming in artificial languages and the regularisation
    of unpredictable variation. Journal of Memory and Language. 91, 158–180.
  • Wonnacott, E., Joseph, H. S. S. L., Adelman, J. S. and Nation, K. (2016) Is children’s reading “good
    enough”? Links between online processing and comprehension as children read syntactically ambiguous sentences. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 69 (5). Pp. 855-879.
  • Joseph, H. S., Wonnacott, E., Forbes, P., & Nation, K. (2014) Becoming a written word: Eye movements
    reveal order of acquisition effects following incidental exposure to new words during silent reading. Cognition, 133(1), 238-248.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2013) Statistical Mechanisms in Language Acquisition. In P. Binder & K. Smith (eds.). The
    Language Phenomenon, Springer.
  • Wonnacott, E., Boyd, J.K, Thomson. J.J., & Goldberg, A.E. (2012) Input effects on the acquisition of a
    novel phrasal construction in 5 year olds. Journal of Memory and Language, 66, 458-478.
  • Wonnacott, E. (2011) Balancing generalization and lexical conservatism: An artificial language study with
    child learners. Journal of Memory and Language, 65, 1-14.
  • Perfors, A. & Wonnacott, E. (2011) Bayesian modelling of sources of constraint in language acquisition. In:
    Arnon, Inbal and Clarke, Eve V., (eds.) Experience, variation and generalization : learning a first language. Amsterdam ; Philadelphia: John Benjamins , pp. 277-294
  • Smith, K., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Eliminating unpredictable variation through iterated learning. Cognition,
    116, 444-449.
  • Perfors, A., Tenenbaum, J.B., & Wonnacott, E. (2010) Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of
    verb argument constructions. Journal of Child Language, 37, 607-642.
  • Wonnacott, E., Newport, E.L., & Tanenhaus, M.K. (2008) Acquiring and processing verb argument
    structure: Distributional learning in a miniature language. Cognitive Psychology, 56, 165-209.
  • Wonnacott, E., & Watson, G. (2008) Acoustic emphasis in four year olds. Cognition, 107, 1093-101.

Steve is Associate Professor of Teacher Education. He is a curriculum tutor for the Geography PGCE and MSc Learning and Teaching.

Steve is a qualified geography teacher and was previously the head of department at a comprehensive secondary school in Oxfordshire, and Head of Programmes at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln.

He holds an MA in Educational Leadership and Innovation from Warwick University, an MSc in Educational Research Methodology and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford which were funded by an ESRC Studentship. He is a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He researches at the intersection between the academic discipline and school subject of geography, including recent collaborations developing through the Smart Cities Network for Sustainable Urban Future project which was shortlisted for the 2017 Newton Prize (India). He is currently leading research on Climate Change Education Futures in India (GCRF) in collaboration with colleagues at IISER, Pune, and on the role of cultural heritage in curriculum making in Kolkata.

Collaborations with colleagues in the School of Geography and the Environment are contributing to anti-racist curriculum futures, including in the school subject, and in postgraduate teaching through the TDEP-funded Oxford-UNISA course ‘Decolonising Research Methods’.

His research on teacher education focuses on the contribution that geography education research offers to the conceptualisation and practice of teaching. This work includes ethnographic research on teachers’ curriculum making exploring the journeys through which information travels into school classrooms, beginning teachers’ experiences of school subject departments, and the role of written lesson observation feedback in constructing ‘good teaching’.

Steve serves on the editorial board of the journal Geography, and is Chair of the Geography Education Research Collective (GEReCo/IGU-CGE).

 

Leon Feinstein is Director of the Rees Centre and Professor of Education and Children’s Social Care.

Mark teaches the English Language Teaching module on the MSc course in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA). It is a 2-term optional module for both experienced and less experienced teachers of English with the opportunity to put theory into practice.

Mark has worked in ELT for over thirty years and has been a teacher, course writer, director of studies, examiner, materials writer and an academic consultant to OUP.

For the University of Oxford, Mark is also a teaching associate of the EMI Research Group. In this capacity he has designed and delivered several EMI courses in the Department of Education at Oxford University as well as in China and Serbia.

Mark also works as a consultant trainer and course writer for the British Council and has designed and delivered EAP and EMI teacher training courses at universities in Brazil, Peru, Chile, Mexico, Morocco, Russia, Belarus, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Germany, Austria, Czechia and Italy.

Mark is an alumnus of the University of Oxford, Department of Education and was among the first to be awarded the innovative MSc. in Teaching English in University Settings.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Julie is Professor of Education and Adoption. She leads the Hadley programme of research within the Rees Centre.

The research focuses on improving the outcomes for children looked after by the state and those who leave care on permanence orders such as adoption and special guardianship orders. For example, research on understanding the best ways to train and support those who are parenting children who have been maltreated or are traumatised by past experiences. Her research is ‘close to practice’, ensuring strong partnerships with social care agencies and the third sector.

She is a member of the National Adoption and Special Guardianship Leadership Board. Julie was awarded a CBE for her work in 2015.

Julie has contributed expert evidence to NICE reviews and is an academic advisor to UK and international governments. She has appeared as an expert witness in contested adoption hearings in the Supreme Court in Australia and in family courts in England.

Samantha-Kaye Johnston is a Research Officer at the Oxford University Centre for Educational Assessment (OUCEA).

Samantha-Kaye was formally educated in Jamaica, where she completed her Bachelor of Science in Psychology. In England, she received her Master of Arts in Education and then completed her Ph.D. in Psychology in Australia. Using a cognitive psychology lens, Samantha’s expertise and interest lie at the intersection of education and psychology. She aims to link these areas with evidence-based e-learning technologies to improve teaching, learning, and assessment outcomes.

Samantha has 10+ years of experience in the project management sector, where she has been actively involved in education development initiatives. In 2016, as part of her Project Capability, she founded the Marlon Christie scholarship, which provides a scholarship for Jamaican students with reading difficulties to attend university. As an extension of this project, Samantha founded Reading for Humanity, to elevate the science of reading, the science of learning, and the science of technology within the classroom. Her work is informed by her experience as an advocate and researcher in Jamaica, England, and Australia, primarily within the K-12 sector, as well as within non-governmental, private, community organisations, and United Nations bodies.

She has experience as a University Associate at Curtin University and Teaching Associate at Monash University, as part of their undergraduate and graduate psychology teaching teams. Within this space, she has been teaching and/or assessing various psychology units, including Introduction to Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Science and Professional Practice in Psychology, and Indigenous and Cross-Cultural Psychology.

During her time in the ed-tech sector, and in collaboration with UNESCO’s Future of Education Initiative, she conceptualised and spearheaded Project Seat-at-the-Table (Project SAT), an international qualitative research initiative that aimed at providing primary and secondary school students with the opportunity to provide their input on the future of technology in their education. As an affiliate at the Berkman Klein Centre for Internet and Society at Harvard University, Samantha’s seeks to strengthen internet governance within online learning. In particular, she is interested in ensuring that the rights of young students are protected while they interact within the digital space, including elevating the voices of students in decision-making processes.

Above all, Samantha believes that every child should have the same opportunity to shape their destiny, emphasing that we cannot always build the future for them, but we can build them for the future. Consequently, her goal is to ensure that teachers implement evidence-based pedagogical approaches that will strengthen 21st-century skills, including, critical thinking and creativity, in all students.

Nathan Thomas is an Applied Linguistics Tutor on the MSc Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching (ALLT) course.

He also teaches on the MA TESOL (Pre-Service) course at the UCL Institute of Education, where he is completing his doctoral research under the dual supervision of Jim McKinley (UCL) and Heath Rose (Oxford).

His research focuses mainly on theoretical developments in the field of language learning strategies and on international students’ strategic learning in higher education. He is also involved in other projects pertaining to English medium instruction and English language teaching. His work has been published in leading academic journals such as Applied Linguistics, Applied Linguistics Review, ELT Journal, Journal of Second Language Writing, Language Teaching, System, and TESOL Quarterly. He has also presented at more than 50 conferences in 14 countries all over the world.

Before his assuming his current roles, Nathan worked for ten years in China and Thailand, most recently as Director of English as a Foreign Language for a private educational consulting company in Beijing. He completed an MSc Teaching English Language in University Settings (which is now the MSc ALLT at Oxford), MEd International Teaching, MA Applied Linguistics (ELT), BA English, and various teaching certificates, all while working full time.

For further information, please click here.

 

Publications

Bowen, N. & Thomas, N. (2020). Manipulating texture and cohesion in academic writing: A keystroke logging study. Journal of Second Language Writing, 50, 100773.

Pun, J. & Thomas, N. (2020). English medium instruction: Teachers challenges and coping strategies. ELT Journal, 74(3), 247-257.

Thomas, N. & Osment, C. (2020). Building on Dewaele’s (2018) L1 versus LX dichotomy: The Language-Usage-Identity State model. Applied Linguistics, 41(6), 1005-1010.

Zhang, L.J., Thomas, N., & Qin, T.L. (2019). Language learning strategy research in System: Looking back and looking forward. System, 84, 87-92.

Thomas, N., Rose, H., & Pojanapunya, P. (2019). Conceptual issues in strategy research: Examining the roles of teachers and students in formal education settings. Applied Linguistics Review (Advanced Access), 1-18.

Thomas, N. & Brereton, P. (2019). Pedagogical Implications: Practitioners respond to Michael Swan’s ‘Applied Linguistics: A consumer’s view.’ Language Teaching, 52(2), 275–278.

Thomas, N. & Rose, H. (2019). Do language learning strategies need to be self-directed? Disentangling strategies from self-regulated learning. TESOL Quarterly, 53(1), 248-257.

Jim McKinley is an associate professor of Applied Linguistics in Higher Education at UCL Institute of Education, and a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

He has been an associate of the EMI Oxford research group since arriving in the UK in 2016. Originally from the US, he later taught and studied in Australia and New Zealand, and also taught for many years on Japan’s oldest EMI program at Sophia University (2005-2016).

At Oxford, Jim regularly collaborates with Dr. Heath Rose as well as Prof. Victoria Murphy, has published with several DPhil students, and supervises dissertations on the MSc ALSLA and MSc ALLT programs.

Jim’s research mainly explores implications of globalisation for L2 writing, language education, and teaching in higher education. As principal investigator on the British Academy-funded project ‘Exploring the teaching-research nexus in higher education’ (2018), he continues to research and publish on the bifurcation of teaching and research in higher education and TESOL in the UK and internationally. Jim is a co-editor-in-chief of the journal System and series co-editor (with Dr Heath Rose) of Cambridge Elements: Language Teaching.

For further information, visit www.researchgate.net/profile/Jim-Mckinley.

 

Publications

Rose, H., McKinley, J., & Galloway, N. (2020). Global Englishes and Language Teaching: A systematic review of pedagogical research. Language Teaching. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0261444820000518

McKinley, J., McIntosh, S., Milligan, L. O., Mikolajewska, A. (2020). Eyes on the enterprise: Problematising the concept of a teaching-research nexus in UK higher education. Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00595-2

Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2020). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2020). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics. Routledge.

Rose, H., McKinley, J. & Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J. (2020). Data Collection in Applied Linguistics Research. Bloomsbury.

Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J., & McKinley, J. (2019). Language and the development of intercultural competence in an ‘internationalised’ university: Staff and student perspectives. Teaching in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2019.1686698

McIntosh, S. McKinley, J., Milligan, L., & Mikolajewska, A. (2019). Whose values? Whose time? Issues of (in)visibility in academic practice in UK universities. Studies in Higher Education. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2019.1637846

McKinley, J. (2019). Evolving the teaching-research nexus. TESOL Quarterly, 53(3), 875-884.

McKinley, J., Dunworth, K., Grimshaw, T., Iwaniec, J. (2019). Developing intercultural competence in the third space: postgraduate studies in the UK. Language and Intercultural Communication, 19(1), 9-22.

McKinley, J. & Rose, H. (2018). Conceptualizations of language errors, standards, norms and nativeness in English for research publication purposes. Journal of Second Language Writing, 42, 1-11.

McKinley, J. (2018). Integrating appraisal theory with possible selves in understanding university EFL writing. System, 78, 27-37.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2018). Japan’s English medium instruction initiatives and the globalization of higher education. Higher Education, 75(1), 111-129.

Rose, H. & McKinley, J. (2017). The prevalence of pedagogy-related research in applied linguistics: Extending the debate. Applied Linguistics, 38(4), 599-604.

McKinley, J., & Rose, H. (Eds.) (2017). Doing Research in Applied Linguistics: Realities, Dilemmas and Solutions. Routledge.

McKinley, J. (2015). Critical argument and writer identity: Social constructivism as a theoretical framework for EFL academic writing. Critical Inquiry in Language Studies, 12(3), 184-207.

 

 

Prior to coming to the Department of Education Oxford, Liz held positions as an Associate Professor in the Division of Language Sciences at UCL and an Assistant Professor in Psychology at Warwick.

She was previously at Oxford as a Junior Research Fellow housed in the Department of Experimental Psychology and Linacre College. Her degrees are in Linguistics and Artificial Intelligence (University of Edinburgh;  MA Hons) and Brain and Cognitive Sciences (University of Rochester, USA; MSc & PhD). Between her degrees, she worked briefly as Teacher of English to students of other languages.

Broadly speaking, Liz is interested in human language learning. Her research explores the extent to which this rests on input-driven, statistical learning processes, both in the context of learning a first native language, and in learning further languages in later childhood or adulthood. She is interested in learning that occurs both in naturalistic contexts and in input-limited contexts (such as the classroom), as well in the educational implications of statistical learning approaches for modern foreign language