CIE Events Archive

Education, inequality and institutions: evidence from international assessments 1995-2015 (Public Seminar)

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05 June 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Robin Shields, University of Bath

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

This seminar will present recent research the relationship between economic inequality and educational achievement as measured by large scale assessments. We begin by identifying a debate within the literature between those who advocate a "skills premium" for achievement and those who warn against the harmful consequences of inequality for achievement. We use a more extensive empirical dataset and more robust statistical models to show that the relationship between achievement and inequality is moderated by income: in other words, the relationship is different in high-income and low-income countries. The former demonstrates a relationship consistent with the “skills premium” literature, while the latter suggest that inequality has negative consequences for achievement. We then evaluate possible models of the causal relationships involved, looking at varieties of capitalism and capabilities as two alternative explanatory frameworks.

Robin Shields' research investigates global trends in education, with a focus on the application of new or innovative quantitative methodologies. Recently, he has published on international trends in higher education such as flows of international students and communication networks on social media. He is particularly interested in the application of multi-level statistical models, and the statistical analysis of social networks. He has undertaken research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, the European Commission, the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education, and the Higher Education Academy. In 2014, Robin received the George Bereday award for the most outstanding article in the Comparative Education Review, and he currently serves as co-editor of the journal. He is Senior Lecturer at the University of Bath and Director of the Doctoral Programme in Higher Education Management.

Universities: learning from the past for the future

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07 March 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Safaroz Niyozov, Aga Khan University, Institute of Education, Pakistan

Respondent: Dr Hubert Ertl, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Schools: learning as a precondition to teaching?

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28 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Margery Evans, Aga Khan Education Services

Respondents:Dr Ann Childs, Department of Education and Dr Barbara Bruns, The World Bank

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Contexts: mathematical thinking before and outside of school

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21 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Professor Terezinha Nunes, Department of Education

Respondent: Sheila Manji, Aga Khan Foundation

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

The role of WISE research in supporting creative action and building the future of education through collaboration (Public Seminar)

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20 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Dr Asmaa E. Al-Fadala, Director of Research at the World Innovation Summit for Education (WISE)

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Dr. Asmaa Alfadala, Director of Research, WISE, will speak about how the World Innovation Summit for Education, through its research and other programs, raises international awareness of education’s crucial role of in the empowerment of communities and transformation of societies. Since its establishment in 2009 by Qatar Foundation, under the leadership of its Chairperson, Her Highness Sheikha Moza bint Nasser, WISE has grown into a thriving global, multi-sectoral platform dedicated to creative, purposeful action in education. WISE has raised the status of education among global priorities, and has established itself as a resource for new approaches to education.

The WISE community is a diverse network of stakeholders who share ideas, expertise, and solutions to address the wide range of evolving education challenges. WISE Research collaborates with recognized, leading experts from the community to produce concrete, focused examinations of core topics, often featuring improved practices in diverse contexts around the world, and including policy guidance for education leaders at all levels.

Dr. Alfadala will present the findings of her research on developing and supporting effective principals with leadership skills that reliably produce improved student learning.

Given the variety of unique school issues and contexts involved, her research is focused on identifying appropriate, innovative leadership development approaches and strategies that can be shown to drive sustainable change in teaching practice with positive impact on student learning.

The research includes case studies illustrating current approaches that systems and schools take to develop and support their principals, with the ultimate goal of identifying key lessons, tactics, and strategies that system leaders can take to build principals’ skills.

Emotions: a necessary disposition for learning?

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14 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Kristen Bub, Illinois

Respondent: Zuloby Mamadfozilov, Aga Khan Foundation, Tajikistan

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Pluralism: learning to change or learning for change?

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07 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr Farid Panjwani, UCL

Respondent: Jayne Barlow, Global Centre for Pluralism

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Tools: the television as a stimulus to distributed meaning-making

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31 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Dr David Johnson, Department of Education

Respondent: Aric Noboa, Discovery Learning Alliance

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Systems: systems of learning or learning systems?

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24 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speaker: Andrew Cunningham, Aga Khan Foundation.

Respondent: Michelle Holmes, The Partnership to Strengthen Innovation and Practice in Secondary Education (PSIPSE)

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Re-examining the meaning of learning in an uncertain world

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17 January 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Syndicate Room, St Antony’s College

Speakers: Caroline Arnold, Aga Khan Foundation and Dr David Johnson, Department of Education

Conveners: Dr David Johnson, Caroline Arnold, and Andy Cunningham, Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Further information: Naseemah Mohammed

Political discourse and education reforms concerning "equality of educational opportunity" in Japan

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25 February 2016 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Akito Okada, Institute of Global Studies, Graduate School, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies.

Convener: Dr David Johnson, Centre for Comparative and International Education in association with the Oxford Education Society.

Abstract

This presentation aims to throw light on the evolution and historical transformation of the concept of equality of opportunity as applied to educational policies in Japan from the end of World War II to the present day. It analyses the Central Council for Education’s (CCE: Chūō kyōiku shingikai) reform proposals in recent years, and places them in the context of developing the concept of equality of educational opportunity in the years since 1945, when the post-war education system was established in Japan.

More specifically it addresses the following questions: What kinds of equality of educational opportunity have the central administrative bodies (Ministry of Education or the CCE), the political parties (mainly Liberal Democratic Party) and teachers aimed to achieve since the war? How have they applied equality of opportunity to educational policies? What kinds of criteria are used by them to measure equality of educational opportunity?

This presentation is also to expand on the existing literature on educational policies in contemporary Japan by examining how the current educational reform efforts have affected equality of educational opportunity among children from different family backgrounds.

Dr Akito Okada is an alumnus of the Department of Education having completed his DPhil in Comparative and International Education in 1998 under the supervision of Professor Roger Goodman and Professor David Phillips. Akito is currently Professor at the Institute of Global Studies, Graduate School, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies and a visiting fellow at University College London from October 2015 to March 2016.

He is central coordinator for the international students’ education program (ISEP TUFS), and responsible for the delivery of lectures from the doctoral to undergraduate and research students.

His research interests include comparative and international education, intercultural communication, education reform and policy, international student education and education for international understanding. He is the author of “Education Policy and Equal Opportunity in Japan”.

How well are children in Sudan taught to read compared to other countries in the Middle East and North Africa? (Public seminar)

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09 November 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Maia Chankseliani, Centre for Comparative and International Education Abstract: This seminar examines the development of a National Learning Assessment in Sudan and reports on the findings of its first study. We know that National Learning Assessments can play an important role in demonstrating the efficiency of investments in education, help governments to monitor the effectiveness of educational interventions and policies, and address issues related to equity and to provision.  It is largely through frequently repeated assessments of learning achievement that policy makers can tell the extent to which investments in education do in fact result in educational progress. Without such repeated measures there can be little understanding of trends in student learning outcomes and as such, robust evidence to guide policy and investment in education will remain elusive. The first study sought to establish how well students had been taught to read and to carry out basic mathematical operations in the early years of schooling in Sudan.  The achievements of Grade 3 students in Sudan are compared with children of a similar age and stage of schooling in 5 other Arabic speaking countries. The findings point to deep and worrying learning deficits across the region About the speaker: Dr David Johnson is a Chartered Educational Psychologist registered with the Health Professions Council (UK) and the British Psychological Society. He convenes the MSc Education (Comparative and International Education). He is associated with Oxford’s Blatvanik School of Government. He has expertise in educational assessment and testing and has carried out numerous studies into children’s learning and the professional knowledge and capabilities of teachers and school leaders in developing countries. He has worked extensively on the development of curriculum and assessment policies, national learning assessments and initiatives aimed at strengthening the delivery of education, including educational management information systems.

Education in Sudan: past and present

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10 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Lost decades in Japan's education: impacts of the narrative of 'playing catchup with the West'

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03 February 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Why civic education matters for democratic transition: A discussion about the cultivation of liberal knowledge and values in Iran and other repressive regimes

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27 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

Too pale and stale: the politics of prescribed texts in the teaching of culturally diverse students in Australia and England

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20 January 2015 17:00 - 18:30
Pavilion Room, St. Antony's College

Convener: David Johnson    

On postcoloniality, subjectivity, and education mobility

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20 May 2014 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room G

Convened by the Centre for Comparative and International Education Research Abstract Dr Hannah Soong's study on current developments in the education-migration nexus, particularly in Australia, reveals that such nexus offers new possibilities. It has increased greater aspirations of international students in embracing what transnationalism now offers. By using a  range of insights from postcolonial theory, Appadurai’s work on imagination and Bourdieuian lenses of habitus and capital, Hannah wishes to provide a constitutive analysis of the processes of subjectivities that the individual transnational subjects experience, of global mobility and flexible citizenship. The question taken up for this session is understanding what new subjectivities are being voiced in the convoluted imaginations, desires, hopes and sense of belongings animating the terrain of contemporary student mobility? Theoretically, this analysis raises questions of how educational mobility is taking part in the transformation and production of subjects, between self and others, articulated from different cultural points. The theoretical thinking is illustrated with an empirical study drawn from an in-depth longitudinal research of 7 student-migrants over a period of 2 and a half years, revealing the mode of transnational consciousness, as being-in-flux. Her study, with student narratives playing an important role in supporting the theoretical insights, does not romantise student mobility nor present students as victims. Building on the work of Appadurai and Bourdieu, her study also focuses on the idea of imagination and various forms of capitals to examine the ‘pains and gains’ of global mobility. But the focus of the session today is looking at the subjectivities for such transnational individuals as 'fitting-in, 'looking-out’ and ‘being-in-flux’, and how will such conceptualisations of shifting subjecitvity contribute to the field of transnationalism and educational mobility.

On international politics and online publishing

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05 March 2014 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room G

Convened by the Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

The Tottenham youth riots and the rise of fascism

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24 February 2014 10:30 - 12:00
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education. All are welcome and there is no need to book. Abstract In this presentation, Dr. Dillabough will discuss her work-in-progress on the historical events and movements leading up to and informing the Tottenham youth riots, including racialised ideas and forces related to the integration of the "Colonial Royals" (the West Indians and other black African communities who worked for the Royal Forces). Dr. Dillabough draws on theoretical, conceptual, and methodological insights deriving from continental philosophy, political science, cultural geography, and history. A unifying objective across all her research is to develop an interdisciplinary agenda that confronts larger questions and cultural exclusions cross-nationally and particularly in cities.

In, out, in out, shake it all about: schooling and the development of basic concepts for learning in Nigeria

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11 February 2014 17:00 -
Seminar Room 1, Department of International Development, QEH, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB

Children and Youth in a Changing World: A University of Oxford inter-departmental seminar series (Department of Education, School of Geography and the Environment, Department of International Development, Department of Social Work and Intervention).

On children's rights and labour in India

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05 February 2014 15:30 - 17:00
Seminar Room G

Convened by the Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

Learning Chinese in Africa: toward new ethnographic understandings of trade, aid, and education (Public Seminar)

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11 November 2013 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Ernesto Macaro, Director, Department of Education Abstract It is virtually axiomatic in education studies today that schooling is a human right. Such a view is often premised on particular ideas about students as autonomous subjects and as holding individual interests in their own wellbeing and economic futures. Without discounting that such human rights models of the student and of education are embedded in school policies potentially worldwide, and that such models are advanced through policy discourses of trade and aid, this work expands our understanding of the meaning of development in education. The focus is a generation of eastern African students who are enrolled in Chinese language and culture classes—most of whom preliminary research shows to be young men seeking to join an international market economy while continuing to retain close social ties with family and local communities.  I will argue that analysis of these students’ educational goals—or of what I refer to as students’ “educational imagination”—requires thinking beyond simplistic “eastern versus western” models (or, as the case may be “Confucian versus African” models) of education and development. It requires an ethnographic-anthropological model that links places to prosperity, sees markets as both generative and restricted, and recognizes multiple simultaneous models of education as leading to opportunity. With such a model in hand scholars may begin, I argue, to analyze more precisely how trade, aid, and education in reality go hand-in-hand.

CCIER Seminar on Student Mobility

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09 November 2013 09:00 - 17:00

Convened by the Centre for Comparative and International Education Research

SchoolScapes: educational imaginaries in comparative and international contexts

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29 May 2013 08:45 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Schools play a key role in mediating future social imaginaries and educational desires. The Centre for Comparative and International Educational Research (CCIER), based at the Department of Education, is hosting a one day Knowledge Exchange seminar to bring together doctoral students, researchers, and practitioners from IIEP/UNESCO to discuss the significance of schooling for producing and transforming current and future generations. The event will consist of short talks and discussion of pre-circulated papers, and will include consideration of how current approaches to the conceptualization of Knowledge Exchange are naturally broadened by approaching education as an on-going practice of knowledge application to social realities. The programme can be downloaded here. Papers will explore the role of schooling within broader social processes and conflicts. Discussants will be drawn from among CCIER faculty affiliates and colleagues from the IIEP/UNESCO.  Dr. Annie Nie will provide a keynote lunchtime talk on Chinese Patriotic Education in the Internet Era. To access the conference papers, click here.

Kitchen Stories

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06 March 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room A

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Discussant: Anne Watson, Department of Education "In the early 1950s Sweden's Home Research Institute is conducting studies into domestic habits. Armed with clipboards, a Swedish delegation arrives in a Norwegian rural district, with the aim of observing the kitchen routines of single men. One hapless observer, Nilsson, is assigned to a particularly reluctant farmer...." (worldcat.org)

African School: Love, Football, and Money (episodes 1, 2, 4)

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20 February 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room C

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Guest discussant: Professor Nancy Kendall, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Etre et Avoir

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13 February 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room C

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Guest discussant: Professor Deborah Reed-Danahay, University of Buffalo “Focuses on a single-class French village school, which is situated in a remote Auvergne farming community….” (worldcat.org)

Sango Malo: A Village Teacher

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06 February 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room A

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Discussant: Amy Stambach “A new high school teacher brings turmoil to a rural Cameroonian village when he introduces sex education and vocational training into the curriculum….The local authorities however, including the store owner and school's headmaster, are alarmed by the teacher's radical actions and have him imprisoned.” (worldcat.org)

SchoolScapes: Rishi Valley School, Andra Pradesh

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30 January 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room A

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Discussant: Sahar Romani, University of Oxford “Inspired by the cinema of Lumière and the ideas of the 20th century Indian thinker Krishnamurti, David MacDougall this time explores a famous progressive school in South India, the Rishi Valley School.” (imdb.com)

An Ecology of Mind: A Daughter’s Portrait of Gregory Bateson

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23 January 2013 14:30 - 16:30
Seminar Room A

Grab some coffee, find comfortable chair, and join us in watching and discussing “school themed” films. Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Discussant: John Mason, Department of Education "…a film portrait of Gregory Bateson, celebrated anthropologist, philosopher, author, naturalist, systems theorist, and filmmaker, produced and directed by his daughter, Nora Bateson." (worldcat.org)

Comparative perspectives on educational policy priorities in commonwealth small states (Public Seminar)

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14 January 2013 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education Abstract This seminar develops a critical perspective on the international transfer of educational policies with special reference to the experience and distinctive needs and priorities of small states worldwide. The analysis draws upon recent comparative and international research carried out for the Commonwealth Secretariat and presented at the 18th Conference of Commonwealth Education Ministers (CCEM) in Mauritius in August 2012.In the light of locally grounded findings, the presentation examines how and why educational priorities held within many small states differ from those most strongly promoted and advanced by the Education for All targets and Millennium Development Goals. Implications for planning currently being carried out for the post 2015 Development Framework will be explored in the discussion. About the speaker Michael Crossley, AcSS, is Professor of Comparative and International Education, Co-ordinator of the Research Centre for International and Comparative Studies (ICS) and Director of the Doctor of Education Programme (Bristol and Hong Kong) in the Graduate School of Education.  He was Director of the GSoE MPhil/PhD Programme from 1994-2000 and is a former Editor of the journal Comparative Education, a former Chair of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) (2002-2004); and a member or former member of the Editorial Boards for the International Journal of Educational Development, Comparative Education, Compare and Research in Post Compulsory Education.  Professor Crossley is a founding Series Editor for the Bristol Papers in Education: Comparative and International Studies (Symposium Books), a Consulting Editor for the International Review of Education and a Research Associate and International Editorial Advisory Board Member for the Comparative Education Research Centre (CERC), at the University of Hong Kong. More...

Higher education policy and research: a focus on global science

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27 November 2012 11:00 - 12:30
Seminar Room G/H

Convener: Professor Amy Stambach, Centre for Comparative and International Education

The Bhutan National Education Framework, GNH and the development of the science curriculum: opportunities and tensions

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08 March 2011 18:00 - 19:00
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Dzongkha in education in Bhutan and the promise and the peril of English

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08 March 2011 17:00 - 18:00
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Meaning of 'education' in rural life in Bhutan

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01 March 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Bhutan: from a traditional to a (post)-modern society, challenges and opportunities

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22 February 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Information technology, education and modernisation in Bhutan: the cultural space between policy and practice

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15 February 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Growing up as refugees: young Bhutanese people's political learning and action

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08 February 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Wisdom, knowledge or both: the changing ethos of education in Bhutan

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01 February 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Transmission, translation and transformation: "lineages" of law and democratisation in Bhutan

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25 January 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk

Education, culture and modernisation in Bhutan

%speaker%

18 January 2011 17:00 -
Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College

Conveners: David Johnson and Chelsea Robles Part of the seminar series: Education and the Politics of Culture and Modernisation in Bhutan Traditionally, education in Bhutan took place only in the monastery (Phuntso, 2000). The monastic school system took its framework from Buddism with its distinctive educational principles, theories, practices, methods and techniques; the goal being spiritual enlightenment. Since the introduction of English-medium primary and secondary education in the early 1960’s, the country has quickly developed a system, modelled on education in the West, and has done in ‘25 years what most countries take centuries to accomplish (Solverson, 1995)’. Bhutan now boasts a comprehensive system of free education highly prevalent in terms of social attention and enrolment. As Bhutan continues the implementation of its 10th five-year development plan, underpinned by the philosophy of Gross National Happiness, even greater emphasis is being placed on the development and expansion of the education system. Education is seen as the ‘core instrument’ through which Bhutanese culture and values are conveyed to citizens (Ministry of Education, 2009). However, there are two divergent strands of thought regarding the role of education in national development and modernisation. While some argue that schools and curriculum can foster traditional values rather than create a ‘modernising effect,’ others believe that school is inherently modernising (see Amer and Youtz, 1971; Wagner, 1981). Recent education reforms have sought to address these issues by localising the curriculum at all grade levels (Ministry of Education, 2009a; Wangyal, 2006). The tension between modernisation and the maintenance of traditional cultural values is high and runs through all sectors of society. This seminar series will explore the politics of culture and modernisation and the effects of this on the implementation and expansion of mass education in this fledgling democracy. For more information please contact: Chelsea Robles: chelsea.robles@linacre.ox.ac.uk David Johnson: david.johnson@sant.ox.ac.uk