Events archive

The theory practice nexus in teacher education: learning across contexts

%speaker%

25 May 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor Anton Havnes (Visiting Research Fellow), Centre for the Study of Professions, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

The presentation explores students’ conceptions of the relationship between theoretically oriented learning in the higher education setting and the more practice-based learning in students’ placement learning in schools. Based on students’ descriptions of what they learn, and how they learn, in these contexts, four dimensions of the complexity of the theory-practise nexus in teacher education are identified: (1) From the general to the concrete, particular and contextual. (2) From relating to rules and laws about school, pupils and teaching/learning to meeting individual pupils and unique situations. (3) From understanding to application; from knowing to doing. (4) From making plans of upcoming teaching to responding ad hoc to what happens in class. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the traditional notion of “bridging the gap” between higher education does not do justice to these students’ descriptions of learning across contexts. Rather than searching for a “shared vision” (Hammerness 2008), students were concerned about the differences between the contexts. The analysis emphasises discontinuities as a key dimension of the relationship between higher education and work, the need to understand the two systems as functionally diverse, and the importance of preparing students to understand and make sense of the learning opportunities of each context as well as their interrelatedness and their disparities.

Re-visioning history education

%speaker%

18 May 2017 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room C

Speaker: Dr Jason Todd, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Drawing on my doctoral study exploring how young people’s engagement with history outside of the classroom shapes the development of their historical consciousness, I address the implications of this engagement for history teachers and young peoples' learning.  My study, building on socio-cultural perspectives, examined the ‘lived experience’ of young people’s memory work. It used the First World War as a context and adopted a mixed methods approach that included work with several small groups of students who constructed their own ethnographic accounts of societal and familial remembering and their emerging historical consciousness. Drawing on the findings I challenge some orthodox conceptualisations of the purposes of history education, and argue for a greater engagement with young people’s affective desires and the remembering  done outside the classroom. While the work has quite specific implications for history teachers related to the ways in which they could enable young people to engage with the complexity of the First World War and understand its continued resonance in the contemporary world, the main aims of this seminar are to:  explore the implications for teachers of better understanding how young people orient themselves in time; and to make the case for a history pedagogy that is more responsive to young people’s needs and their process of making and remaking their identities.

Dealing with task uncertainty: complex demands in schools and teachers’ responses

%speaker%

09 March 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Kasper Munk, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Using video capture analysis with student-teachers in an ITE partnership: supporting the development of student-teachers' subject knowledge for teaching and reciprocal learning between schools and universities

%speaker%

23 February 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: Stefanie Sullivan, Director of Initial Teacher Education, University of Nottingham

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

The social justice dispositions of teachers and their pedagogic work (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

13 February 2017 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Speaker: Professor Trevor Gale, School of Education, University of Glasgow

Convener: Trevor Mutton, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

The focus of this paper is on how social justice practices are enacted in education, specifically through the pedagogy of secondary school teachers – the subject of a large scale, multi-site qualitative Australian Research Council project.

Informed by Bourdieu’s concept of habitus (disposition collectives), the research conceives of ‘social justice dispositions’ (SJDs): the tendencies, inclinations, and leanings that provide un-thought or pre-thought guidance for socially just practice. I begin the paper with questions of methodology, of definition and justification. Because SJDs are defined as operating between belief and practice, they are difficult to study using conventional methods such as interviews (a simple focus on what is said) or observations (what is done).

While not the only approach taken, the paper foregrounds the use of stimulated recall procedures as technique to provoke teacher participants to ‘speak to practice’, thereby raising to consciousness otherwise unspoken dispositions that guide teacher action in classrooms. I then turn to focus on activism, as one disposition found in the research to characterise teachers’ socially just practice. In identifying moments of ‘subversion’ in teachers’ practices, I examine the activist disposition as the tendency or inclination to struggle against the social order or doxa (Bourdieu, 1977). Bourdieu argues that ‘the immediate adjustment of the habitus to the field – by other principles, such as rational and conscious computation’ (Bourdieu, 1990: 108) means that activism is predominantly confined to ‘radical critique’ of doxa emerging in times of crisis.

Our research both confirms and challenges this account. We see the activist disposition of teachers in subtle forms of radical critique, born not out of crisis but instead part of the everyday practice and indeed the pedagogic work of some teachers. Yet in Fraser’s (1997) terms, this is activism for correcting inequitable outcomes – affirmative rather than transformative. Missing from our data are activist teacher dispositions aimed at ‘restructuring the underlying generative framework’ (Fraser 1997: 23) that produces inequalities. The paper concludes that the social, cultural and material conditions of schools – their field conditions – are important in the formation of activist dispositions, providing them with pedagogic authority to act in socially just ways.

Trevor Gale is Professor of Education Policy and Social Justice, and Head of the School of Education at The University of Glasgow.

He is a critical sociologist of education, and draws on Bourdieu’s thinking tools to research issues of social justice in schooling and higher education.

He is Principal Investigator on two current Australian Research Council projects: Social justice dispositions informing teachers’ pedagogy in advantaged and disadvantaged secondary schools (with Cross and Mills) and Vocational institutions, undergraduate degrees: distinction or inequality (with Webb, Rawolle, Hodge and Bathmaker).

His most recent book (with Lynch, Rowlands and Skourdoumbis), published by Routledge, is Practice Theory and Education: Diffractive readings in professional practice.

He is the founding editor of Critical Studies in Education and is widely published in journals such as Journal of Education Policy, British Journal of Sociology of Education, Cambridge Journal of Education and Studies in Higher Education.

Teacher Education and Professional Learning Reading Group

%speaker%

26 January 2017 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Reading:

Johnson, M. (2016) Feedback effectiveness in professional learning contexts Review of Education Vol. 4, No. 2, pp. 195–229 DOI: 10.1002/rev3.3061 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/rev3.3061/abstract

Knowledge traditions in the study of education; an international exploration

%speaker%

17 November 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Speakers: John Furlong and Geoff Whitty

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this talk we draw on evidence from a number of different jurisdictions in order to clarify the range of intellectual traditions and practices that collectively constitue the field of Education today. Specifically we ask what we can learn about the current construction of the field by looking comparatively at ‘the Education project’ in different 7 different jurisdictions -  England, France, Germany, Latvia, Australia, China and the USA.  What are the similarities and differences in the ways in which knowledge in the field is traditionally constructed and the ways in which it is currently contested and is changing?   Asking questions about knowledge in Education is important because whatever the ‘settlements’ of the past, they are increasingly being called into question around the world.  As university and school systems become drawn more and more into a world of competitive international performativity, then it raises, in ever sharper terms, questions about the value of the study of Education.

Exploratory studies with mentors and trainees in school-based ITE to identify and develop more productive orientations towards learning from experience

%speaker%

03 November 2016 15:00 - 16:30
Seminar Room H

Speaker: Tessa Blair, DPhil student, Department of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Title and abstract to follow but Tessa will be reporting on the first phase of her study, exploring the use of an ‘Orientations to Learning from Experience’ framework in participatory action research with mentors and trainees.

Teacher Education and Professional Learning Reading Group

%speaker%

06 October 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room E

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Discussion of shared reading:

TEPL Research Group Seminar

%speaker%

09 June 2016 16:00 - 17:00
Seminar Room C

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

This seminar will be a discussion of the issues explored in Marilyn Cochran-Smith’s Foreword to Beauchamp et al (2015) Teacher Education in Times of Change: Responding to the challenges across the UK and Ireland’ .  The book is an important analysis of teacher education policy across the five nations (with chapters written by two members of the group, Ian Menter and Trevor Mutton) and the foreword helps to locate the key issues within a wider international context.

A pdf of the reading can be downloaded from Weblearn here. If you are not able to access the reading, please contact Phil Richards, Research Secretary.

Education in an era of superdiversity: effective ways to reach all learners

%speaker%

04 May 2016 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room G

Speaker: Professor David Mitchell, University of Canterbury, New Zealand

Conveners: Dr Ian Thompson and Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

In this presentation, David Mitchell will give a preview of his forthcoming book, Diversities in Education (Routledge), which focuses on gender, ethnicity, socio-economic status, religion and ability differences. He argues that it is an indictment on politicians and educators that underachievement and discrimination among diverse learners has been tolerated for so long. He further argues that this situation need not continue for we know enough about its causes and remedies to take effective action. In his presentation, David will address several themes pertaining to diversity, including theories of distributive justice, inclusive education, human rights, an ecological perspective, interest convergence, mismatches of cultural capital, disruptive technologies, and evidence-based policies and practices.

David Mitchell is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. He has over 200 publications, mainly in the fields of special and inclusive education. He has held visiting professorships and has presented lectures and workshops in over 50 countries. His most recent consultancies with the New Zealand Ministry of Education include a review of the literature on wraparound models of services for students with severe behavioural and social difficulties and a review of educational adaptations for learners from low-socioeconomic families. His most recent books are Contextualizing Inclusive Education (2005/2008) and What Really Works in Special and Inclusive Education, Second edition (2014), both published by Routledge. The latter has been or will be translated into six languages. As well, he co-edited a book, Crises, Conflict and Disability: Ensuring Equality, which was also published by Routledge (2014). His next book, Diversities in Education will be published in September.

Closing the Gap: issues, challenges and impact of the implementation of a national experiment in educational research (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

29 February 2016 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room A

Speakers: Dr Ann Childs, Dr Nigel Fancourt, Dr Roger Firth, Professor Ian Menter and Dr Ian Thompson, Department of Education

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

During 2012, the National College for Teaching and Leadership, working in collaboration with a number of partners, designed a major research and development initiative entitled Closing the Gap - Test and Learn.  The contract to run the project was awarded to CfBT who worked in partnership with CUREE and the Universities of Durham and Oxford to deliver the scheme from 2012-2015.

They invited lead teaching schools in teaching school alliances to apply to take part in a national trial of seven particular intervention programmes, each of which had been identified as having significant potential in 'closing the attainment gap'.  That is, they were programmes designed to improve the attainment of children who were low achievers.  A total of more than 700 Schools joined the programme in its first year and bid to work with one or more of the interventions.  Half of the schools went into the trial group and commenced the programme during 2014.  The other half of the schools went into a control group and waited until the next academic year to undertake the programme.  In all schools a sample of pupils was identified for participation in the scheme and were given pre- and post-tests before and at the end of the Year 1 trial period.  The scheme was thus designated as a form of Randomised Control Trial

In this seminar the Oxford team offer an analysis of the project as a whole, drawing not only on data gathered during its implementation but also on additional data derived from interviews with a number of participants.

In particular we look at:

  • the 'policy origins' of the entire scheme, the ways in which it emerged out of: the development of teaching schools, the 'closing the gap' objective of the Coalition government; the desire to increase research capacity within the teaching workforce; as well as other elements;
  • the extent to which the overall methodology can indeed be described as a Randomised Control Trial. Although this was a very large scale initiative, the actual interventions were each carried out with relatively small numbers of pupils in a very diverse range of contexts;
  • the extent to which evidence emerged from the project to suggest that teachers in schools were becoming increasingly research-literate and that the 'school-led system' was developing research capacity through engagement in a scheme such as this;
  • the research ethics issues raised by such a large scale randomised controlled trial, and in particular the decisions around which interventions to include and continue, which leads on to an argument for a principle of educational equipoise.

Supporting the development of the profession: a clinical approach to teacher learning

%speaker%

18 January 2016 12:30 - 14:00
Seminar Room D

Speaker: Larissa McLean Davies, Associate Professor, Melbourne Graduate School of Education

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group

Abstract

The current focus on Teacher Education reflects governmental and societal recognition that teachers have the most significant in-school impact on student learning (Barber and Mourshed 2007; Hattie 2012; TMAG 2015). As a consequence of this, much greater attention, has been paid to the amount of time pre-service teachers spend in schools, leading to a ‘practicum turn’ in teacher education (Mattson  et al 2011) and an international focus on teaching as a clinical practice profession (Alter and Cogshall 2009; Burn and Mutton 2013; Conroy et al 2013; Dinham 2013; McLean Davies et al 2015).  While the intention of a clinical approach to teaching has been primarily to enhance the capacities of pre-service teachers, recent research shows the potential of this approach to extend beyond Initial Teacher Education, and impact on practices at both of the sites of learning—The University and the school/s involved.  Using the University of Melbourne’s Master of Teaching as a case study, this talk will examine the ways in which a clinical approach to teacher education can impact on learning and teaching in the broadest sense, and will explore the policy and practice implications of this for school leaders and other key stakeholders.

Associate Professor Larissa McLean Davies is Deputy Director, Learning and Teaching  in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education; in this role she has oversight of the pre-service Master of Teaching, and is currently managing the re-accreditation of this program  across 3 streams: Early Childhood, Primary and Secondary. In addition to this role, Larissa is Senior Researcher in the MGSE International Teacher Education Effectiveness Research Hub.  Larissa’s research and publications are in pre-service teacher preparation, clinical teaching, the teaching of literature and the secondary English curriculum; she is lead Chief Investigator on a  recently awarded Australian Research Council Discovery Grant ($805K AUS) to explore disciplinary knowledge in the making of English teachers (DP160101084).

Realising and extending Stenhouse's vision of teacher research: the case of history teachers

%speaker%

26 May 2015 16:30 - 18:00
Seminar Room B

Convener: Dr Katharine Burn, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group and the Subject Pedagogy Research Group

Drawing a line between autonomy and individualism: practices of teacher induction and continuing professional development of teachers in Finland

%speaker%

28 October 2014 16:00 -
Seminar Room E

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract The induction phase initiating a teaching career is a challenge in Finland, as well as in many other countries. In some countries, policy makers seem to borrow neoliberal models from other countries in rather straightforward ways with sudden policy changes and unexpected consequences, which has been realized, for instance, in Sweden. (Geeraets, Tynjälä, Markkanen,  Pennanen, Heikkinen & Gijbels 2014.) In this presentation, the social-political preconditions of practices of teacher learning and development are addressed. The theoretical insights offered by this presentation are rooted in the theory of practice architectures. This theoretical framework is based on a multi-perspective approach on practice.  Practices can be studied as (1) performance, work, activities and activity systems, (2) from the perspective of meaning and discourse, and (3) in terms of power, solidarity. Thus, with regard to ‘practice architectures’, we will study practices with regard to the (1) material-economic (‘doings’), (2) the cultural-discursive (‘sayings’), and (3) the social-political preconditions (‘relatings’) (Kemmis & Heikkinen, 2012; Kemmis, Heikkinen, Fransson, Aspfors & Edwards-Groves 2014; see also Nicolini 2013). The social-political dimension enables us to study also elements of power and solidarity which enable and constrain our everyday practices and go beyond material-economic and cultural-discursive considerations.  One of the most important element of the cultural-discursive preconditions of practices of teacher learning and development is that of professional autonomy.

The cultivation of critical literacy in secondary schools: insights from UK policy and international practice

%speaker%

16 October 2014 16:00 -
Seminar Room E

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract Although ‘critical literacy’ appears in a number of UK educational policy documents, its meaning is contested resulting in professional disengagement and patchy provision (Reid 2012). This seminar will summarise current scholarship on critical literacy as a cross-curricular skill and will provide an overview of its interpretation in UK educational policy. The results of a comparative research study conducted in Australia and New Zealand will be shared, outlining innovative practical approaches which prioritise critical literacy in the classroom. Particular mention will be made of Victoria's vocational education pathway, Dunedin's 'critical literacy learning community' and New South Wales' oracy continuum. Critical literacy deserves more attention in UK classrooms - come along to find out why! About the speaker Dr Arlene Holmes-Henderson is a post-doctoral researcher in the Faculty of Classics, University of Oxford, working on the Classics in Communities project. She completed the PGCE in Classics at Trinity College, Cambridge and taught Latin, Greek and Classical Studies in secondary schools in Scotland and England for eight years before completing her Doctorate in Classics Education. She has diverse interests in both Classics and Education: her thesis was titled, 'A defence of Classical rhetoric in Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence'. This work argued that Classics (and rhetoric in particular) has much to offer the teaching and learning of literacy, critical literacy critical thinking and responsible citizenship. Arlene has recently returned to Oxford from two international collaborations: one as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Hawaii, and the other as  Churchill Fellow at the Universities of Auckland, Otago, Melbourne and Sydney.

Fear of freedom?! Ambivalences and patterns of success in implementing research-based learning and teaching methods in teacher education. Interim results

%speaker%

09 October 2014 14:00 -
Seminar Room C

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract This paper presents initial results and experiences of the implementation of research-based learning and teaching methods in teacher training at the Carl von Ossietzky University, Oldenburg/Germany since October 2011. By this concept, we mean, on the one hand, the close integration of (genuine) university research and teaching, and on the other, the autonomous design, implementation and presentation of self-selected student research work. The aim of this "research-teaching" approach is, firstly, to provide the students with key theoretical and methodological empirical research skills and to initiate critical and reflective thinking processes. The actual research work on a real object of investigation is carried out in relatively autonomous student research groups. A main goal of this process is to establish a research habitus, based both on the individual acquisition of knowledge and on the ability to transfer research-based teaching methods in the future (teaching at school). Specifically, this paper asks to what extent these assumptions are feasible under the conditions of modularised study structures, which resistors and ambivalences show up and what effects can be achieved in teacher training with this concept.  

Revised teacher education syllabus at the University of Oslo: an example from English subject didactics

%speaker%

24 June 2014 14:00 -
Seminar Room C

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract The Department of Teacher Education and School Research at the University of Oslo is Norway's leading academic environment in the fields of Subject Didactics, Educational Leadership and school based research and development. The main task for The Department is to qualify teachers and school leaders for work in Norwegian schools. The Teacher Education Programme gives qualifications for work as a teacher in upper primary and secondary school as well as in adult education. The programme is offered both as a full-time study programme over two terms and as a part-time study programme over three terms. The two major components of the programme are classroom practice and educational and didactic theory. Classroom practice normally takes place at one of the Department`s Partner Schools. Over the last few years, the department has developed integrated teacher education programmes. By integration we mean a coherent study design where scientific subjects, school subjects, pedagogy, subject didactics, theory and practice constitute a whole as a basis for teaching as a profession. In this presentation, I will explain how this integration has been planned and conducted in English subject didactics; how pedagogy and didactics have been integrated, and how the lectures are integrated with the seminars in the second semester. The aim has been to prepare the student teachers for teaching, avoiding the “practice shock” and providing education that might help the student teachers orient themselves towards extended professionality, valuing theories underpinning pedagogy, and adopting a rationally-based approach to teaching, rather than restricted professionals concerned mainly with the practicalities of day-to-day teaching, as argued by Hoyle (1975). About the speaker Lisbeth M Brevik is a PhD candidate at the University of Oslo, Department of Teacher Education and School Research, Oslo, Norway. She lectures on the teacher education programme, and is responsible for English subject didactics. She is a recognised student at the University of Oxford, Department of Education, Trinity term 2014. Supervisor: Anne Edwards.

Current developments in teacher education in Australia

%speaker%

09 June 2014 14:00 -
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract Australia has recently experienced a ‘national agenda’ applied across teacher education, teaching and schools. This agenda has seen such changes as a new consistent school starting age for all Primary and Secondary students, a national curriculum being rolled out across the country beginning with the areas of Maths, English, History and Science and a new assessment and reporting system with national testing in the areas of Literacy and Numeracy applied across Year 1,3,5,7 and 9. National professional teaching standards have been recently established and all teacher education providers must now show evidence of how their courses meet the graduate standards in order to meet national accreditation. Finally a national ‘partnerships’ agenda has seen significant funding provided designed to strengthen linkages between initial teacher education programs and the transition to beginning teaching and teacher induction. This presentation will discuss firstly these current developments and the implications for teacher education. Two research projects funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council and embedded within this national agenda will also be discussed. Project Assessment (www.teacherassessment.net) and Project Evidence (www.teacherevidence.net) have both aimed to improve pre-service and in-service professional learning in particular at the site of theory-practice nexus in professional experience using the national professional standards. Professor Simone White is Chair of Teacher Education in the Faculty of Education at Monash University. Her research, scholarship and service are focused on the key question of how to best prepare teachers for diverse school contexts and communities. Simone’s research areas include; teacher education curriculum; early career teacher identity; professional experience; teacher professional learning; teacher educator career pathways and university-school-community partnerships.

Can psychological research improve selection of teachers? (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

03 March 2014 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Lars-Erik Malmberg, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract Increasing public attention in the UK is being focused on the quality of schools and on the effectiveness of teachers in those schools. There are very good reasons for the attention: teacher effectiveness may be the critical factor driving variation in student achievement, and some evidence shows that relative effectiveness may not change much over the course of a career. We know instinctively and through research that teachers’ psychological characteristics influence effectiveness, but these characteristics are not always reliably identified in the process of selecting teachers or candidates for teacher training. In this talk, I consider how psychological research can inform how teachers are selected for training and practice, leading to new selection approaches that can strengthen the quality of schools in the UK and elsewhere. About the speaker Robert Klassen is Professor and Chair of the Psychology in Education Research Centre at the University of York. He began his academic career as an Assistant Professor in 2004 in the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Alberta, Canada. His academic group was Psychological Studies in Education, and he served as coordinator from 2006-2012. He was appointed Associate Professor in 2008 and Professor in 2012. Professor Klassen worked as a teacher (1988-1992) and school psychologist (1992-2004) in Vancouver, Canada, with one-year stints in England (1998-99) and Australia (2003). His first two degrees (B.Ed. and M.A., Educational Psychology) were from the University of British Columbia, and his PhD (Educational Psychology) was from Simon Fraser University (2003). More....

Theory and practice in teacher education (TAPTE)

%speaker%

31 January 2014 11:00 - 12:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract TAPTE is a research project in which Norwegian teacher students' preferences (such as motivation, volition, perceived support from the teacher education institution, etc.) are examined. The project highlights the factors that may affect students' preferences for the teacher education as such and later career, including variations between main groups of students. A questionnaire survey was distributed to Norwegian teacher students in selected institutions (university colleges and universities). The questionnaire consisted of 90 items in total. The survey was partly distributed via e-mail and partly by paper copies. The surveys included the following groups of teacher students: 1. One year undergraduate teacher training programme for candidates with a vocational or general academic educational background 2. Integrated 5 year teacher education programme at university 3. Primary teacher education programme (for teaching in grades 1-7) 4. Primary / secondary  teacher education programme (for teaching in grades 5-10) 5. General teacher education programme (for teaching in grades 1-10), old model The response rate for the survey was within the range typically found in surveys of students and other adults (N=491). The presentation will report on the results of this survey.

Learning to teach in England: evolution of policy, routes into teaching, and university-school partnerships

%speaker%

16 October 2013 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract The research project, “Learning to teach in England: evolution of policy, routes into teaching, and university-school partnerships” aims to explore how and under what conditions the current approaches to teacher education in England contribute to the professional education of teachers in an era when the school curriculum is becoming more complex and the student population is becoming more diverse. The research will include the study of policy and program documents, the identification of dominant routes into teaching, interviews with route directors, and program curriculum designers, and interviews and observations of teacher educators, including tutors and mentors, interns / future teachers, and recent graduates. At all times my research focus is on understanding the organizational adjustments made by universities and schools as they design and implement diverse approaches to teacher education. The main research questions guiding the study are: - How has emergent policy affected the structure, content and practice of teacher education? - How has organizational learning occurred for both universities and schools? What are the specific cognitive demands required at different organizational levels? How have the conceptions of teaching and teacher education changed? What has been lost and what has been gained? - How have changes in teacher education policy affected teacher’s actual work, their professional knowledge, and their day-to-day practice? About the speaker Dr. Maria Teresa Tatto did her graduate work at Harvard University, receiving an M.A. in Administration, Planning and Social Policy (MA’82), and an Ed. D., in Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research, and in Comparative Education (EdD’87). Dr. Tatto did her undergraduate work in educational and organizational Psychology at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (BA’81). Dr. Tatto has been a professor at Michigan State University since 1987. During the academic year 2013-2014 Dr. Tatto is spending her sabbatical leave as a Visiting Research Scholar at the University of Oxford.

Panic stations: mapping two crises of teacher quality

%speaker%

09 May 2013 16:00 - 17:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ian Menter, Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract This presentation explores the use of ‘panic’, or what Klein (2007) has termed ‘shock doctrine’ in relation to education, and specifically, the contemporary ‘crisis’ of teacher quality as it is playing out in Australia, as indeed is also the case in other parts of the Anglophone world. It argues that in the context of globalized education policy discourses around standards and accountability, panic is increasingly used as a tool by politicians and policy makers to manipulate and shape public opinion about teachers and their work, with two key sets of ‘policy effects’ (Ball, 1994) ensuing. The first set, external to the teaching profession itself, is the intended effect of the panic, and positions teachers’ practice as a problem to be solved by politicians and bureaucracies to the benefit of society, and as a consequence, undermines social trust in teachers and schools. The second set of effects, I argue, more corrosive and problematic, is internal to the profession and perhaps less intentional, relating to the impact of the panic upon teachers’ practice. Here I argue that successive waves of teacher quality panic have begun to mediate teachers’ practice and shape teacher habitus and professional identity. I begin with a background to ‘panic’ within public discourse, before moving to chart the first crisis of teacher quality, as represented in a selection of politicians’ speeches, press releases and interviews, media reports and policy documents, highlighting the current crisis of teacher quality, as presented by politicians and policy makers, as a ‘hot button’ issue. I then move to consider the second crisis, exploring the ways in which it can currently be seen to be manifesting and its likely short and long term consequences for teacher education, professional development and the teaching profession itself. The presentation concludes with some discussion of possibilities for refocusing the debate around issues of greater educational substance with more generative consequences for teachers and learners. References Ball, S. J. (1994). Education reform: A critical and post-structural approach . Buckingham: Open University Press. Klein, N. (2007). The shock doctrine: The rise of disaster capitalism New York: Picador. About the speaker Nicole Mockler is a Senior Lecturer in Education at the University of Newcastle, Australia.  Her research interests include the politics of education and education policy, particularly as they relate to teachers’ work and professional identity.  Her PhD thesis, completed at the University of Sydney in 2008, was entitled Beyond ‘What Works’: Teachers and the Politics of Identity, and combined media and policy analysis and life history research.  Nicole’s recent publications include Facilitating Practitioner Research: Developing Transformational Partnerships (Groundwater-Smith, Mitchell, Mockler, Ponte & Ronnerman, Routledge, 2013) and Rethinking Educational Practice Through Reflexive Inquiry (Mockler & Sachs, Eds, Springer, 2012).  She is currently working on research projects investigating the ‘policy effects’ of the implementation of the national curriculum in Australia and the development of local inquiry-based teacher professional learning structures.

Discontinuity in learning, reflective practice and teacher education

%speaker%

28 March 2013 14:00 - 15:30
Seminar Room D

Convener: Professor Ian Menter Teacher Education and Professional Learning Research Group Abstract In this talk, I develop themes from my book “Discontinuity in Learning: Dewey, Herbart and Education as Transformation” (Cambridge UP, 2013).  I argue that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to both teaching and learning processes. Drawing on the work of John Dewey, I focus my discussion on the notion of teaching as a reflective practice and develop the idea of the teacher’s task as one of interrupting the experiences of learners. This notion of teaching has implications for our understanding of the aims of teacher education and professionalisation. Book abstract “Discontinuity in Learning: Dewey, Herbart and Education as Transformation” (Cambridge UP, 2013) In this ground-breaking book, Andrea R. English challenges common assumptions by arguing that discontinuous experiences, such as uncertainty and struggle, are essential to the learning process. To make this argument, Dr. English draws from the works of two seminal thinkers in philosophy of education – nineteenth- century German philosopher J.F. Herbart and American pragmatist John Dewey. English’s analysis considers Herbart’s influence on Dewey, inverting the accepted interpretation of Dewey’s thought as a dramatic break from modern European understandings of education. Three key concepts – transformational learning, tact in teaching, and perfectibility – emerge from this analysis to revitalize our understanding of education as a transformational process. Dr. English’s comparative approach interweaves European and Anglo-American traditions of educational thought with a contemporary scholarly perspective, contributing to a work that is both intellectually rewarding and applicable to a classroom setting. The result is a book that is essential reading for philosophers and scholars of education, as well as educators. About the speaker Andrea English is Assistant Professor of Philosophy of Education at Mount Saint Vincent University in Canada. Dr. English, an American scholar, previously taught at Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, from which she received her doctorate in 2005. Her work on theories of teaching and learning appears internationally in scholarly journals and essay collections.

Curriculum reform in England: where are we now?

%speaker%

13 February 2013 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

A joint seminar with Oxford Brookes University School of Education. Conveners: Dr Helena Mitchell (Oxford Brookes) and Professor Ian Menter (OUDE) Abstract Within weeks of coming to power the Coalition Government initiated a process to review the national curriculum. The original intention was that it should be completed in ten months so that a new national curriculum could be implemented in September 2013. Timescales have shifted but the stated intention is still that reforms will be in place by September 2014. Mary James will provide an insight into the process of reform from her position as a member of the ‘Expert Panel’, appointed in 2011 to guide the evidence gathering process, and her personal interpretation of subsequent events.

All welcome – refreshments will be available after the seminar.

Whose low aspirations? What are we to do about attainment in disadvantaged areas

%speaker%

14 November 2012 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Ian Menter Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group Abstract What is the evidence on whether educational attainment can be raised by focusing interventions on changing attitudes of parents and children? Liz Todd led a multi-disciplinary team at Newcastle University, commissioned by Joseph Rowntree Foundation, to answer this question. Previous policy had called for attitude change including raising aspirations, but this had led to initiatives set up largely without looking at evidence of impact. They found no evidence that impact on attainment is mediated by change in any of three attitudes - aspirations, locus of control and valuing school. Their report argues for a shift in emphasis from ‘raising aspirations’ to ‘keeping aspirations on track’. Whist this presentation summarises the research and shows how the conclusions were reached, Liz Todd puts forward for discussion some perhaps more fundamental issues that were brought to light by the review about the relationship between research and educational policy. This includes a sustained focus on particular goals (ie ‘raising’ aspirations) without evidence of change as a result of that focus, the kind of research needed to inform interventions to raise attainment and the negativity with which some communities are viewed. The speaker Professor Liz Todd is a psychologist who’s worked as market stall trader, maths teacher, educational psychologist, and therapist. Her funded research has looked at community-orientated schools; child participation; and the myths of raising aspirations. Current interests: reducing educational inequalities; demonstrating that society’s not broke; making mini-films of academic ideas; using video and narrative to bring change in relationships; children’s political activism; effecting real democratic participation in society; and developing fairness in children’s services in light of current funding and policy changes. She is also very interested in helping practitioners to use research well in decisions about practice.

Diverse teachers, diverse learners (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

12 November 2012 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Ian Menter Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group

Changing places, changing spaces? Towards understanding teacher education through space-time frameworks (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

21 May 2012 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor John Furlong Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group ABSTRACT This presentation draws together theoretical ideas from studies of space/spatiality and the history of teacher education. These ideas form a theoretical framework through which to analyse the findings from a small-scale ethnographic study of the geographical relocations made by two university Schools of Education in England. Data collection instruments included documentary analysis, field notes from dedicated observations, pre- and post-relocation questionnaires and semi-structured interviews, again pre- and post-relocation. The findings indicate the ways in which the spaces of teacher education are integral to the historical and contemporary practices, social relations and professional identities found in the field.

Excellent research for excellent teacher education? (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

30 April 2012 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor Anne Edwards Director, Department of Education Abstract Drawing on studies carried out in the United Kingdom over recent years, Ian Menter will examine how research in, on and about teacher education may influence policy and practice in teacher education. He will review teacher education research in the UK over the past decade, drawing on the database established by the Teacher Education Group. He will also draw on the experience of leading a review of literature on ‘Teacher Education in the 21st Century’ for the Review of Teacher Education in Scotland, carried out in 2010/11. Significant policy changes in teacher education are under way across the UK. However, the extent to which these developments are drawing upon research evidence is very variable. Ian will argue that it is desirable, indeed essential, that high quality research should play a significant part in the development of teacher education policy and practice. There is a serious challenge here for researchers as well as for policymakers. All three approaches to teacher education research – in, on and about teacher education - are essential for the development of high quality systems that are fit for purpose in the 21st Century.

Teacher professional development pandemic? A diagnosis, prognosis and potential remedy (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

05 March 2012 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Professor John Furlong, Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group In this seminar, Professor Hobson discusses some emergent findings from his ‘Modes of Mentoring and Coaching’ (MoMaC) research, which was funded by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation. The main focus of the research has been an examination of non-school based or ‘external’ mentoring associated with three national support programmes for teachers of secondary science in England, namely the Physics Enhancement Programme, the Science Additional Specialism Programme, and the Stimulating Physics Network. While these programmes were introduced to help address specific issues relating to secondary science teaching in England, not least the chronic shortage of qualified physics teachers, the MoMaC research suggests that external mentoring has provided wider benefits and has broader applicability. Professor Hobson focuses on what he considers may be a ‘tip-of-the-iceberg’ finding which presents a major barrier to the professional learning and development of many teachers but which, on the evidence of the MoMaC research, can be alleviated by providing teachers with the opportunity to access subject-specialist, external mentoring support.

Understanding beginning teachers’ perspectives on internship, induction and the bridges in between

%speaker%

10 November 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room D

Conveners: Dr Viv Ellis (OSAT) and Dr May Cheng (Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group) Abstract The focus in this presentation is on understanding shifts in the notions of professional expertise and identity related to collaborative practices in teacher education. The ideas proposed here rely on findings of two studies: a one-year study on the practices and activities located in one pre-service teacher education program in England set up as a partnership between university and schools and promoting collaborative approaches to learning, and an in-progress research on teachers’ induction experiences in various sites of professional practice. The analysis focuses on how intern-teachers and beginning teachers understand support and learning in the program and how different enactments of the relational aspects of learning and working in schools shape and are being shaped by who they are becoming. This work is supported by CNCSIS, project RU_PD 21/2010.

Why educational researchers and teachers must differentiate between knowledge and experience (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

20 June 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: Dr Roger Firth Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group In his talk Michael Young will discuss the changes in his ideas about knowledge and the curriculum from his first book Knowledge and control (1971) to his most recent book Bringing knowledge back in (2008) and in particular why he has come to emphasise the importance of teachers and educational researchers differentiating knowledge from experience. He will discuss how both his own professional experience in the UK and South Africa and his re-reading of the works of Emile Durkheim, Lev Vygotsky and Basil Bernstein have influenced these changes.

The future of teacher education: competence, evidence or wisdom (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

23 May 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Conveners: Dr Alis Oancea Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain and Dr May Cheng Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group. In recent years policy makers and politicians have become increasingly interested in teacher education. One could read this as a positive development that indicates that policy makers and politicians have a real concern for the quality of education and have recognised that the quality of teacher education is an important element of the overall picture. One could also read it more negatively by observing that now that governments have established a strong grip on schools through a combination of testing, measurement, inspection and league tables, they are turning their attention to the education of teachers in order to establish total control over the educational system. There is therefore a lot at stake with regard to the question about the future of teacher education. In this lecture I will discuss recent trends in the discussion about teacher education, focusing on two ideas that are increasingly defining the discourse about teaching and teacher education. One is the idea that teaching should be based on the results of scientific evidence; the other is the idea that teaching can be fully captured in terms of competencies. I argue that both ideas fail to capture the reality of teaching and are therefore insufficient and potentially problematic as reference points for teacher education. Based on the assumption that teaching is a multi-dimensional teleological practice, that is, a practice constituted by aims and ends, I will argue that central to good teaching is the ability to make situated judgements about what is educationally desirable. This is not a matter of the application of evidence, nor should it be understood as a competence. Instead I will argue that we should see this as a virtue, that is, a quality of the person, and therefore as something that requires the exercise of practical educational wisdom. Teacher education, so I will argue, should focus on the cultivation of such wisdom and the wider 'virtuosity' of teaching. I will make some suggestions for ways in which such wisdom can be cultivated in teacher education. Gert Biesta (www.gertbiesta.com) is Professor of Education and Director of Research at the School of Education, University of Stirling, and Visiting Professor for Education and Democratic Citizenship at Mälardalen University, Sweden. He is editor-in-chief of the journal Studies in Philosophy and Education. His research focuses on the theory and practice of education and educational research, with a particular interest in the relationships between education and democracy. Recent books include Beyond learning: Democratic education for a human future (Paradigm 2006); Improving learning cultures in Further Education (with David James; Routledge 2007); Rethinking contexts for learning and teaching (co-edited with Richard Edwards and Mary Thorpe; Routledge 2008); Good education in an age of measurement: Ethics, politics, democracy (Paradigm Publishers 2010); and Learning democracy in school and society: Education, lifelong learning and the politics of citizenship (Sense Publishers 2011).

Beyond Partnership: the essential role of Higher Education in the preparation of teachers (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

07 March 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: May Cheng Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group Abstract This seminar will consider how the processes of educating and preparing teachers for the workforce in schools has in recent years been the focus of relentless criticism, continual interference and constant reform. We are now at a turning point where policy makers are questioning the worth of not only the content but also the very point and purpose of initial teacher training. In addition to an increasing variety of training routes into teaching, it will soon be possible for the government’s new ‘Free Schools’ to recruit staff who have had no training at all. Looking at the preparation of workforces in other professions, Roger Woods will defend the place of initial teacher training and education and argue for the essential involvement of universities in the development of a workforce for a world class system of schooling. The White Paper anticipated Autumn 2010 (see http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/departmentalinformation for further information. Professor Roger Woods was elected Chair of the Universities’ Council for the Education of Teachers (UCET) for the term of office August 2008 to July 2011, having previously been a member of UCET’s Management Forum. In September 2010 he retired from the post of Executive Dean of the Faculty of Education, Law and Social Sciences at Birmingham City University, a position he held for nine years. Graduating in psychology, Professor Woods trained as a primary teacher and spent his early career working for the Inner London Education Authority. He left the ILEA to become Principal of The British School in Kathmandu. When he returned to the UK he worked as both a class and deputy headteacher in the London Borough of Bromley, before entering teacher education in 1985. He gained experience as primary school partnership co-ordinator and B.Ed Course Leader before becoming Dean of Professional Studies at Westhill College, now part of the University of Birmingham. Amongst Roger’s professional interests is the development of policy and practice in teacher education and training. He has researched and written about issues of school partnership and the roles of school-based mentors in initial teacher training. Roger moved to the Faculty of Education at the University of Central England, now Birmingham City University, in 1999, as Associate Dean. He was appointed Dean in 2001. As Chair of UCET Roger has been involved in negotiations with the TDA over the development of the Masters in Teaching and Learning and more recently he has been involved in debates over the teaching of reading using phonics and the place of higher education in the preparation of teachers.

Teaching and Teacher Education Reading Group meeting

%speaker%

03 March 2011 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room H

Convener: May Cheng Paper: Hayhoe, R. & Li, J. (2010) The idea of a normal university in the 21st Century Frontiers of Education in China, 5(1), 74-103.

Teacher education policy and teacher education practice: policy drivers and their implications (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

21 February 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: May Cheng Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group Abstract What drives change in teacher education policy and practice? What are the respective contributions of research and experience, ideology and conceptions of professionalism? What seeds, and sustains experimentation? How far has regulation driven, and how far constrained change? These are complex and challenging questions. At a time when challenging questions are being asked about the nature, location and funding of initial and continuing teacher education in England, the seminar will consider the ways in which regulation and practice have underpinned the structure of teacher education over the last fifteen years and the prospects for the time to come. Professor Chris Husbands is currently director-designate of the Institute of Education, a position he takes up in January 2011. He began his career as a secondary school teacher before entering higher education; he was formerly Director of the Institute of Education at Warwick University and Dean of Education and Lifelong Learning at the University of East Anglia. He has extensive experience in wider education work; currently a Board Member at the Training and Development Agency for Schools, where he has served on accreditation, research and audit committees and member of the Learning Panel at the National Trust, he has also served as a Board member at two examining groups – Edexcel and the Assessment and Qualifications Alliance. He has taught or undertaken consultancy in three continents. Professor Husbands has written widely on issues of teacher education and education policy more generally. He was director of the National Evaluation of Children’s Trusts which explored the relationships between teachers and other professionals in supporting children’s well-being and led the UK component of the International Alliance of Leading Education Institutes report on Transforming teacher education (2008).

Teach First: myths and reality (Public Seminar)

%speaker%

24 January 2011 17:00 - 18:30
Seminar Room A

Convener: John Furlong (Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group) Abstract Teach First is a distinctly different employment-based route for training teachers. The programme aims ‘to address educational disadvantage by transforming exceptional graduates into effective, inspirational teachers and leaders in all fields’. To achieve this, Teach First places high-quality graduates into challenging secondary schools for two years. In the first year, the graduates are trained to meet the Standards for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) while employed as unqualified teachers. There are many myths generated by the reluctance of the Teacher Education community to accept the programme, yet successive Governments have continued to support its growth. The impact has been profound. Professor Sonia Blandford is Honorary Senior Research Fellow, University of Oxford and Professor of Education and Innovation, University of Warwick. She has authored over 50 published books and articles focusing on educational leadership, professional development and special educational needs. Sonia is currently National Director, Achievement for All (DfE funded) and adviser to Ministries of Education in Lithuania, Latvia and Norway.

Teaching and Teacher Education Reading Group meeting

%speaker%

26 November 2010 13:00 - 14:00
Seminar Room C

Conveners: May Cheng and John Furlong Theme: Partnership and teacher education (related to PGCE review work) The readings for this meeting are available as downloads from WebLearn for members of the Teaching and Teacher Education Research Group who are students or staff members of the University of Oxford. Click on the titles to access WebLearn. Akkerman, S.F. & Meijer, P. (2010, in press) A dialogical approach to conceptualizing teacher identity Teaching and Teacher Education Korthagen, F.A.J. (2010) Situated learning theory and the pedagogy of teacher education: Towards an integrative view of teacher behavior and teacher learning Teaching and Teacher Education, 26, 98-106. Please contact May Cheng if you would like to become a member of the group.

Perspectives on language learning: a study of MFL PGCE student teachers in four institutions in the UK

%speaker%

09 November 2010 13:00 -
Seminar Room K/L

Conveners: May Cheng and John Furlong Speakers: Dr Robert Woore and Professor Ernesto Macaro, Department of Education, University of Oxford. A seminar jointly convened between the Applied Linguistics and Teaching and Teacher Education Research Groups. There has been an increasing concern, among a group of UK-based teacher educators, of a mismatch between evidence-based principles of language learning and the predominant approach to teaching in the MFL UK context. Four teacher education institutions produced their own set of principles and asked student teachers to react to these at the beginning and end of their PGCE programme using a Likert scale questionnaire plus further open-ended comments; the aim being to ascertain whether ST beliefs aligned themselves with their institution’s principles or diverged from them over time. We will present some initial findings of both a quantitative and qualitative nature.