Department of Education

Viewing archives for Learning and New Technologies

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Dr Anne Geniets is a Research Fellow with the Learning and New Technologies Research Group

She is a medical doctor, developmental psychologist and communications & media scholar, with a research focus on health, social justice, training and technology in low- and middle-income countries.

Anne’s main research interest is in exploring the links between health, training, inequality and technology. Anne has carried out health care- and media-related research projects in the UK, Africa and South Asia.

From 2014 – 2016, Anne has been the research officer and post-doctoral researcher on the ESRC-DFID funded mCHW project, a learning intervention to train community health workers and their supervisors in the assessment of developmental milestones of children under five in two marginalised communities in Kenya.

She is leading the Go_Girl: Code+Create Project (with Niall Winters) and collaborates on a number mHealth training research projects.

Current doctoral students

Isobel Talks (co-supervised with Niall Winters)

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Sophie Booton is a research officer working on the LiFT project.

The Learning for Families through Technology (LiFT) project is a collaboration between Ferrero international and three research groups in the Department of Education: Applied Linguistics, Learning and New Technologies, and Families, Effective Learning, and Literacy. The project aims to examine key questions about children’s learning with technology, with a focus on language and literacy skills.

Within the project, Sophie is investigating vocabulary development in children with and without English as an Additional Language. Sophie’s research interests lie in children’s cognitive and emotional development, particularly in in how areas of development interact to affect children’s learning and well-being.

Before joining the Department of Education, Sophie studied for her PhD in Psychology at the University of Sheffield. Her doctoral research in collaboration with Dr Daniel Carroll focused on the impact of emotional states on children’s self-control. Prior to her PhD, Sophie gained a MEd on the Mind, Brain and Education programme at Harvard Graduate School of Education, and a BA in Experimental Psychology from the University of Oxford.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

Miranda is a General Surgeon who has spent much of her career working in South Africa.

She is interested in the potential of online education to scale up the health workforce worldwide but would like to know more about how students learn online and the pre-requisites for a successful learning experience.

Peer reviewed publications
  • Clarke H, Voss M. The role of a multidisciplinary student team in the community management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Mar 10:1-6. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Voss M, Coetzee F, Conradie H, van Schalkwyk S. “We have to flap our wings or fall to the ground”: The experiences of medical students on a longitudinal integrated clinical model.
  • Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Daniels-Felix D, Conradie H, Voss M. Choosing final year placement: Why students decide not to go rural. Afr J Health Professions Educ 2015;7(1 Suppl 1)
  • Hendriks H, Kirsten GF, Voss M, Conradie H. Is Continuous Positive Airway Pressure a Feasible Treatment Modality for Neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Rural District Hospital? J Trop Paedtr 2014; 60(5): 348-351.
  • Voss M, Duvenage R. Operative surgery at the district hospital. S Afr Med J 2011 07/25;101(8):521-522.
  • Voss M, Forward LM, Smits CAC, Duvenage R. Endoscopy outreach: how worthwhile is it? S Afr Med J 2010 03/08;100(3):158-158.
  • Voss M, Pinheiro J, Reynolds J, Greene R, Dewhirst M, Vaslef SN, et al. Endoscopic components separation for abdominal compartment syndrome. Am J Surg 2003 08;186(2):158-163.
  • Voss M, Ali A, Eubanks WS, Pappas TN. Surgical management of pancreaticocutaneous fistula. J Gastrointest Surg 2003 2003;7(4):542-546.
  • Saczek KB, Schaaf HS, Voss M, Cotton MF, Moore SW. Diagnostic dilemmas in abdominal tuberculosis in children. Pediatr Surg Int 2001 03;17(2-3):111-115.
  • Fukumoto S, Tatewaki M, Yamada T, Fujimiya M, Mantyh C, Voss M, et al. Short-chain fatty acids stimulate colonic transit via intraluminal 5-HT release in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 2003 05;284(5):R1269-R1276.
  • Voss M, Hammel P, Molas G, Palazzo L, Dancour A, O’Toole D, et al. Value of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses. Gut 2000 02;46(2):244-249.
  • Madeira I, Terris B, Voss M, Denys A, Sauvanet A, Flejou JF, et al. Prognostic factors in patients with endocrine tumours of the duodenopancreatic area. Gut 1998 09;43(3):422-427.
  • Voss M, Schneider JW, Apffelstaedt J. Axillary lymph node involvement in stage III breast cancer: treatment implications. J Surg Oncol 1999 07;71(3):162-166.
  • Voss M, Moore SW, van der Merwe I, Pieper C. Fulminanting necrotising enterocolitis: outcome and prognostic factors. Pediatr Surg Int 1998 10;13(8):576-580.
  • Voss M, Cotton MF. Mechanisms and clinical implications of apoptosis. Hosp Med 1998 12;59(12):924-930.
  • Voss M, Knottenbelt JD, Peden MM. Patients who reattend after head injury: a high risk group. BMJ 1995 11/25;311(7017):1395-1398.
  • Voss M, Bass DH. Traumatic duodenal haematoma in children. Injury 1994 05;25(4):227-230.
Book

 Public Health: Caring for Communities and Populations, Bettercare, Cape Town

Book Chapter

 Pappas TN, Voss M. 2007. Choledochoduodenostomy. Atlas of Upper Gastrointestinal and Hepatopancreato-Biliary Surgery.  Clavien PA, Sarr MG, Fong Y (Eds). Springer Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Manal is a recipient of the Clarendon Scholarship. Her research is funded by a joint award between the Clarendon Fund and Brasenose College

Her research focuses on the links between social and digital exclusion in the learning of young people. Manal was awarded a distinction for her  MSc. in Education (Learning and New Technologies) at the University of Oxford (2017) and is currently building on that work for her doctoral thesis under the supervision of Professor Rebecca Eynon and Professor Niall Winters. Manal holds an Honours BA in Global Affairs (Middle East & North Africa Studies) from George Mason University (2011) and has five years of experience working in the U.S. and the MENA region.

Research interests:

  • Feminist Studies
  • Critical Approaches in Educational Research

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged com