Department of Education

Viewing archives for Philosophy, Religion and Education

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: The Paradox of Change: A Comparative Study of Education in Ancient and Islamic Egypt in Relation to the Holistic Approach

Hearts in Exile: A New Historical Reading of Elias Khoury’s Gate of the Sun 

Conference Papers

Islamic Holistic Philosophy, September 2017, ‘One World’: Logical and Ethical Implications of Holism” Conference, University of Exeter

 

Liam is a Departmental Lecturer in Science Education. He teaches on the PGCE Science and the MSc in Learning and Teaching programmes, as well as leading the Advanced Qualitative Research course for doctoral students across the Social Sciences Division.

His research interests generally centre around (1) teachers’ engagement with and in research, and (2) epistemic beliefs, cognition, and practices within and across disciplines, but particularly in science.

He is currently engaged in the H2020-funded ‘FEDORA’ project, focusing on future-orientated science education. Prior to his appointment as a Departmental Lecturer, he was a postdoctoral researcher for three years on the Oxford Argumentation in Religion and Science (OARS) project, funded by the Templeton World Charity Foundation.

He has also worked as a researcher on a range of other projects such as an FP7-funded in-service teacher education project on Inquiry Based Science Education (Chain Reaction), a Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) funded project focused on developing the teaching of argumentation on socio-scientific issues in second-level classrooms (STeP into Science), an evaluation of SFI’s national Celebrate Science Week, and a National Forum for Teaching and Learning commissioned exploration of non-accredited CPD for those who teach in Higher Education.

Liam serves as a member of the Teaching Council’s Research Engagement Group (REG) in Ireland, which works to promote teachers’ engagement with and in research. He is also a member of the Research Committee of NARST: A Worldwide Organization for Improving Science Teaching and Learning through Research, and he is an active member of the European Science Education Research Association. Liam reviews for a range of academic journals including the International Journal of Science Education, Science and Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, Research in Science & Technological Education, and Psychology Learning and Teaching.

Szilvi’s main research interest lies in student religiosity. She completed her BA in Theology in Budapest (summa cum laude). After working in a number of ministry and teaching settings, she completed her PGCE in Religious Education at the Department, followed by an MSc in Research Design and Methodology (distinction).

She has been working as a project manager on a large-scale science-religion project at the University of Oxford before starting her DPhil. Szilvi lives in Oxford with her husband and 3 children.

Yibo Wang has an MA in International Marketing from the Coventry University (UK) and a Master’s in Management: Leadership and Organizational Change from the University of Birmingham (UK).

His doctoral research focuses on ‘knowledge hiding’, ‘leadership style’ and ‘Confucian culture’ in Chinese education and training institutions.

As empirical studies on ‘knowledge hiding’ in the Chinese context are scarce, Yibo hopes to uncover underlying mechanism of knowledge hiding and find its potential influence factors.

Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked as a CEO in an educational consultancy based in Beijing that advised the investment and marketing analyses on education and training industry.

Antonin’s research is directed towards global regionalisms in higher education with a specific interest in transnational university alliances. He is currently investigating the pilot phases of the European Universities Initiative, as well as other regional higher education and research networks.

Antonin has just completed an MSc in Comparative and International Education at the department. Prior to joining Oxford, he coordinated international projects at the crossroads of education, culture and social action for various not-for-profit organizations based in France. He also obtained an MA in Film and Philosophy and a BA in Film Studies from King’s College London.

Bernard holds a PhD in Marketing from the University of Nottingham and a DBA from the University of Newcastle.

His research to date explores the leadership in HE. Prior to coming to Oxford, he worked in various HEIs and served as the supervisor of a secondary school.

Publications

Lee, B., Tsui, A. & Yau, O.H.M. (2019), Higher-order Goals, Trust-in-leader, and Self-efficacy as Moderators of Transformational Leadership Performance: The Case of Multi-level Marketing Organizations in China, Journal of Euromarketing, Vol.28 (3-4), 76-97. (2011 RG Impact factor: 0.83).

Conferences

Lee, B. (2020), “Self-formation for the Underprivileged,” 2020 International Online Symposium, Toward a New Paradigm of Economics,organized by Macau Ricci Institute, The University of Saint Joseph, 15 & 16 October. (Online Conference Platform Presentation).

Katy is a Deputy Headteacher and the founder of a Leadership and Coaching Institute, which she now co-directs.

Katy is an Associate Fellow at the Oxford Character Project and a Research Associate at the Oxford University Wellbeing Research Centre. She is the co-founder of Global Social Leaders, a leadership programme which has participants in 105 countries, all passionate about creating and sustaining positive change in the world.

Title of Thesis

How could school leaders improve the flourishing and wellbeing of teaching staff?

Books
  • Granville-Chapman, K. and Bidston, E (2020) Leader: Know, love and inspire your people. Carmarthen: Crownhouse Publishing
Book Chapters
  •  Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ In White, M. & McCallum, F. (Ed.s) Wellbeing and Resilience Education: Covid-19 And Its Impact on Education Systems. Routledge
Publications
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘Purpose and Leadership in Education and Beyond’. The Education Exchange. Available from: https://theeducation.exchange/purpose-and-leadership-in-education-and-beyond/
  • Bidston, E & Granville-Chapman, K. (2020) ‘The Three Secrets of COVID-era Leadership’. Times Education Supplement. Available from: https://www.tes.com/news/three-secrets-covid-era-school-leadership
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2016) ‘Assessing the Impact of a Teacher Leadership Programme in a Teaching Schools Alliance. Journal of Teacher Action Research
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2014) ‘The Afghan conflict: causes and consequences.’ Geography Review 28(1): 22-27
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2013) What are the psychological factors that affect students’ academic resilience and can teachers influence these? Unpublished thesis
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘Unlocking Leadership Potential’, The Magazine of the Boarding School’s Association, 33: 42-45
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2009) ‘Learning to Lead’, Leader, The Education Leader Magazine 41: 22-25
Presentations
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2019) ‘How could leaders improve the flourishing of their teams?’ ‘Stowe Ed Conference’, Forthcoming: 7 Jan 2019
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2018) ‘How could school leaders improve the flourishing of teachers?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education: 21 Jun 2018
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2017) ‘How can school leaders improve teacher flourishing?’ ‘Doing Education Differently Conference’, University of Oxford, Department of Education, 11 Mar 17
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2016) ‘Developing school leaders who enable teachers to flourish’ The Telegraph Festival of Education 23 Jun 16
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Developing leadership in pupils and teachers’ High School Affiliated to Renmin University of China, Beijing. 20 Oct 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Resilience for leaders.’ Global Social Leaders World Summit. 16 Aug 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K (2015) ‘Emotional Intelligence for Leaders.’ Global Leaders in Education. 12 Aug 15
  • Coates, S.; Fraser, H.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J.; and Nasim, A. (2015) ‘Breaking through the glass ceiling – how can schools empower our girls to become leaders?’ Sunday Times Festival of Education. 19 Jun 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. ‘Developing Leadership in Schools’ (2015). G20 Schools Conference. International conference for head teachers. 11 Apr 15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2018) ‘Introduction’, Wellington Leadership Institute: Festival of Leadership. Mar 2012-15
  • Granville-Chapman, K. (2012) ‘How the Young Learn to Lead’, Raffles Institution (Singapore) -Purdue University (USA) Education Forum on Gifted & Talented Youth 2012. Singapore. 15 Mar 12
  • Draper, D.; Dyer, R.; Granville-Chapman, K; Lunnon, J & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Schools’. Presentation for a meeting about pupil leadership and character development at 10 Downing Street. 16 Nov 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K & Seldon, A. (2012). ‘Developing Leadership and Character in Young People’. Presentation for a meeting about leadership and character at 10 Downing Street. 7 Mar 12
  • Granville-Chapman, K. & Seldon, A. (2012) ‘Introduction’, Leading Your School in the 21st Century. 7 Feb 12

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Dina El Odessy is a DPhil student in the University of Oxford, her current doctoral research focuses on the relationship between pedagogic practices, cultural values and educational principles espoused and enacted in community schools in Egypt.

Her research also explores the potential of critical pedagogy in empowering school stakeholders by attempting to discover if community schools have the potential to become sites of praxis in which reflexive action is executed on a collective basis. It is expected that the study may provide new insights into the potential of community schools to provide self-governing learning spaces as well as explain their role in enacting critical pedagogies, along with the challenges that these approaches face in the Egyptian context. In addition, the study attempts to address an existent research gap on alternative models of community schooling, and it is expected to be the first to conceptualize the role of community schools in the analytical framework of holistic critical pedagogy.

Prior to starting her doctoral studies, Dina has earned an MA in Education from University College London (UCL) and a Bachelor of Arts in English from Alexandria University. She believes in the interconnected and multi-disciplinary nature of knowledge, and accordingly has been pursuing different learning opportunities in positive psychology, brain-based learning, postcolonialism, educational leadership, conflict resolution, history and cultural studies.

Dina has also been recently working as the Deputy Director of Alexandria International Schools in Egypt, as well as a freelance writer, and educational entrepreneur. She hopes to become a happiness activist, aiming at bringing about small ripples of change through intermittently running lectures and workshops on well-being, the science of happiness and holistic development.

Research Interests
  • Critical pedagogy
  • Community schools
  • Equity and empowerment
  • Holistic education
  • Alternative education
  • Islamic education
  • Social and emotional learning
  • Informal learning
  • Political education
Title of Thesis

Emergent Critical Pedagogies in Community Schools in Egypt: A Multi-sited Ethnography

Publications

MA thesis: