Department of Education

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Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodology (including design experiments).

His research projects have been supported by various funding bodies: the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education (Institute of Educational Sciences), and the Spencer Foundation.

He was a Guest Editor or co-Editor of three special issues published in different international research journals: a special issue on classroom-based interventions in mathematics education that was published in ZDM – The International Journal on Mathematics Education (2013, vol. 45, pp. 333-495), a special issue on the place of reasoning-and-proving in mathematics textbooks at different levels of education that was published in the International Journal of Educational Research (2014, vol. 64, pp. 63-168), and a special issue on research-based interventions in the area of proof that was published in Educational Studies in Mathematics (2017, vol. 96, pp. 119-274). He was an Editor of Research in Mathematics Education and is currently an Editorial Board member of the International Journal of Educational Research and the Elementary School Journal. He is also an Advisory Board member of the International GeoGebra Institute.

He co-chaired or co-organised topic study groups or working groups at the 11th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Mexico, 2008), the 2nd International GeoGebra Conference (Austria, 2011), the 8th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME) (Turkey, 2013), the 9th CERME (Czech Republic, 2015), the 13th International Congress on Mathematical Education (Germany, 2016), and the 10th CERME (Ireland, 2017). He is currently the leader of the topic working group on “argumentation and proof” at the 11th CERME to be held in Utrecht (the Netherlands, 2019).

He received an American Educational Research Association SIG/RME Publication Award for his 2009 article Reasoning-and-Proving in School Mathematics Textbooks.

Laura specialises in modern languages teacher education.

Before working with the department, she taught French and German in state secondary schools in Oxfordshire. She became interested in teacher education whilst mentoring beginning languages teachers during their school placements.

Laura is the subject lead for the PGCE in modern languages and she also supervises higher degrees in the fields of instructed second language learning and language teacher education. Her recent research has focussed on: the use of the target language for instruction; explicit teaching of language learning strategies; students’ motivation for learning languages other than English; languages teachers’ professional learning needs and experiences; and formative language teacher evaluation.

Nigel is Associate Professor of Learning, Teaching and Values, and is Director of the Masters in Learning and Teaching.

His research broadly encompasses the pedagogical implications of collaborative working, inter-disciplinarity, and intersecting knowledge-practices, and particularly:

  • Conflicting epistemological and ethical demands across professional and educational practices, such as building research capacity in teacher education
  • Research and schools, i.e. how and why teachers engage in and with research, such as the use of attachment theory in schools
  • Religions and schools, notably around curriculum, schooling, ethics and freedom of belief, such as argumentation in religious education and science

Besides teaching on the MLT, he also teaches on the PGCE (in religious education) and on various research degrees, notably for a module on the Philosophy of Educational Research.

Current professional associations: Association of University Lecturers in Religion and Education; British Education Research Association; European Network for Religious Education through Contextual Approaches; International Seminar for Religious Education and Values; Philosophy of Education (Great Britain) Society.

He is on the editorial board of Journal of Beliefs and Values, and also reviews for British Journal of Religious Education, Journal of Contemporary Religion, Oxford Review of Education, and Teachers and Teacher Education.

CONSULTANCY: Nigel welcomes consultancy work with schools, educational organisations and governments, and has carried out projects around the world, notably in Bhutan, India and Lebanon.

Jenni Ingram is Associate Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and Fellow of Linacre College.

She is also a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications and the Royal Statistical Society. She is currently a member of the Mathematics Expert Group for PISA 2021 and the UK observation expert for the TALIS 2018 Video study.

Her research focuses on mathematics education with a particular interest in classroom interaction, language, formative assessment, pedagogy and international comparative studies. Her current projects primarily focus on classroom practices particularly the TALIS 2018 Video study and the Talk in Mathematics project. She is also interested in issues of social justice and two of her current project address this area, the Connectedness project examine secondary school students’ feelings of belonging in school, and the Mindsets and Diversity project explore reasons behind the progress made by undergraduates during their highly mathematical degrees.

Jenni is currently Book Reviews Editor for the international journal Research in Mathematics Education and is also on the editorial board of this journal. She is co-editor of a special issue on interventions and classroom practices for fostering language learners’ mathematics learning to be published in ZDM – Mathematics Education.

She chairs the 12th Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education Topic Working Group on Language and Mathematics and co-chairs the topic study groups or working groups on language in mathematics for the International Congress on Mathematics Education (to be held in Shanghai 2020). She is chair of the International Programme Committee and organising committee of the Fifth ERME Topic Group Conference on Classroom-based research on mathematics and language (to be held in Montpellier in 2020).

She was awarded the Cambridge Journal of Education 2016 Best Paper prize.

Dr Karen Skilling is a mathematics educator and researcher at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

Her research interests include: student engagement and motivation in mathematics; teacher beliefs and practices for promoting student engagement; mathematics instruction across primary through to secondary years; integrated STEM learning, STEM project based activities; and vignette methods

Karen is a Visiting Fellow at King’s College London.

Diane Mayer’s research and scholarship focuses on teacher education and early career teaching, examining issues associated with the policy and practice of teachers’ work and teacher education.

Prior to joining the department in 2018, Diane was Professor of Education and Dean of Education and Social Work at The University of Sydney in Australia. She has previously held positions at the University of California at Berkeley in the United States and at Victoria University, Deakin University and The University of Queensland in Australia. She is currently Honorary Professor at The University of Sydney and also at The University of Queensland.

Diane was PI on the Australian Research Council funded project Studying the Effectiveness of Teacher Education (2011-2015) and the related Australian Government funded project Longitudinal Teacher Education and Workforce Study. These were large-scale, mixed-methods, longitudinal studies designed to investigate the effectiveness of teacher education in preparing teachers for the variety of school settings in which they begin their teaching careers.

Diane is senior editor of the Routledge journal, Teaching Education, and executive editor of Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice. She is on the Editorial Boards of Curriculum Perspectives and also Journal of Education for Teaching: International research and pedagogy.

After completing her PhD in condensed matter physics from the University of Leeds and the Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble, Judith studied on the Oxford PGCE programme and then taught for several years in an Oxfordshire comprehensive school, becoming Key Stage 3 Co-ordinator.

She now leads the science PGCE programme and also teaches on the Masters in Learning and Teaching and the Masters in Teacher Education. Judith runs the Teaching Physics in Schools option for 2nd year Physics undergraduates and is also a founding member of the Oxfordshire Schools Physics Partnership, sponsored by the Ogden Trust (see Physics Education 48(3) 271-273).

Judith’s research interests lie in pre-service science teacher education: the development of knowledge and professional practice in beginning science teachers, particularly in classroom explanations, and the factors influencing the recruitment and retention of physics teachers in the teaching profession. She has recently completed a report for the Education Endowment Foundation and the Royal Society reviewing current evidence of promising educational approaches that are likely to improve the attainment and progression of low-SES students in science education. She is also an Editor of Research in Science and Technological Education, and is on the Editorial Board of Physics Education. She is currently editing an updated edition of the Association for Science Education’s Guide for Secondary Science Education, and is editing a book Nurturing the Rich Learning and Teaching of Science, due to be published with Springer in 2018.

Jason currently works on the History PGCE programme and the MSc Teaching and Learning course.

He obtained his first degree in Cultural Studies from University of East London, followed by a MA in History Education from the Institute of Education. He completed a PGCE in Social Studies at Goldsmiths in 1992. He has worked in a variety of London Schools, including middle management and senior management roles. In 1999 he was awarded AST status with specialism in History Education and Inclusion, he combined this role with part time teaching at Kingston University. He joined the Department of Education in 2010 as a Teacher Education Research Fellow (TERF).

Ian Thompson is an Associate Professor of English Education at the Department of Education and Director of the PGCE course. He is joint convenor of the Oxford Centre for Sociocultural and Activity Theory Research (OSAT) and a Fellow of St. Hugh’s College. He is also a member of the university’s English Faculty. Ian is currently co-PI on the £2.55 million ESRC funded project Excluded Lives: the Political Economies of School Exclusion and their Consequences.

After completing English Literature degrees at the Universities of Leicester and Victoria (Canada) Ian worked as a journalist, lecturer and theatre director. He then taught English for sixteen years in comprehensive secondary schools. Ian studied part time at the University of Bristol and completed his PhD in Education in 2010.

Ian was appointed to his post at the University of Oxford in 2011 where he teaches on the PGCE English course and on the MSc in Learning and Teaching. Ian also supervises several DPhil students. Ian has been PI and co-investigator on several mixed methods and qualitative research projects. These projects include: Collaboration for Teaching and Learning; The Effectiveness of Arts Based Approaches in Engaging with Disaffected Young People; and Disparities in School Exclusion across the UK. He was a core member of the recent BERA Commission for Poverty and Policy Advocacy. In his current research, Ian focuses on English pedagogy, school exclusion, initial teacher education, learning, and social justice in education from a Vygotskian and cultural historical theoretical perspective.

He publishes widely in the fields of cultural historical research, social justice in education, English education, and initial teacher education. Ian is currently Vice-President of the International Society for Cultural-Historical Activity Research.

Gabriel Stylianides is Professor of Mathematics Education at the Department of Education and a Fellow of Worcester College. He is the convenor of the Subject Pedagogy Research Group and the Director of Doctoral Research.

His research focuses on issues related to the meaningful engagement of students of all levels of education (including university students) in fundamental mathematical practices – notably reasoning-and-proving, problem solving, and algebraic thinking. In pursuing his primary research interests he also addressed issues related to task design and implementation, instructional interventions, curricular resources (including textbooks), technological environments (including intelligent tutoring systems), and methodolo