Department of Education

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Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking at the outcomes of children and young people living with long term physical and mental health illness.

 

Neil Harrison is a senior researcher and deputy director of the Rees Centre.

Neil’s primary area of research interest is around access to higher education, especially for groups of people who are disadvantaged or marginalised in society.  This includes topics such as financial support, outreach programmes, alternative qualification routes and the factors underpinning student success.  He has also researched around the engagement of students in internationalised universities and the concept of global citizenship, as well as having an interest in epistemology and ‘expertise’.

His current focus is on the educational pathways and experiences of young people in and around children’s social care system, with a particular emphasis on transitions into adulthood through entry into further education, higher education or the labour market.  He is also leading a five-year study into the impact of attachment and trauma awareness training across 300 schools in England.

Originally trained as an applied statistician, Neil now uses a mixed methods and interdisciplinary approach drawing on concepts and methodologies from sociology, psychology, economics and social policy.

He is an executive editor for Teaching in Higher Education journal, an elected member of the governing council for the Society for Research into Higher Education, a trustee of the National Network for the Education of Care Leavers, a member of the editorial board for the British Educational Research Journal and a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

You can find out more about Neil’s work through his personal webpage.

Nikki is a Research Fellow at the Rees Centre. Her work aims to identify ways for foster carers and educators to support looked after children.

Research topics include mental health and well-being, and experiences in education and in care. She supervises doctoral and master’s students on related topics, and teaches sessions on the PGCE course as well as on the use of systematic review techniques in the social sciences.

Nikki did her PhD on the social understanding, empathy and peer relationships of children in care. Her recent projects include an evaluation of foster carer support groups, an exploration of how experiences in care and education are linked to GCSE outcomes, and the development of a training and assessment package that brings together foster carers and schools to support children’s well-being. She was also part of the Evaluation Coordinators team on Wave 1 of the DfE’s Children’s Social Care Innovations Programme.

Nikki is an Associate of the Higher Education Academy and is an Associate Lecturer in Psychology at The Open University.

  • Part of the editorial board for Developmental Child Welfare
  • Reviewer for Child Abuse Review, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Cognition and Emotion, Child and Family Social Work, Children and Youth Services Review, Development and Psychopathology, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties, Evaluation and Program Planning, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
  • Reviewer for the Economic and Social Research Council (proposals) and the National Institute for Health Research (final report)

Emeritus Professor of Education in the Rees Centre, engaging in research mainly on the education of vulnerable children including children in care.

Research includes factors that contribute to better educational outcomes, a RCT reading intervention combining book-gifting and paired reading and a national research programme developing an evidence base on attachment and trauma training in schools.

  • Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences since 2011
  • ESRC Peer Reviewer
  • Regular reviewer for six journals

Helen joined the Rees Centre in February 2018, after working at the Centre for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University for over four years.

Helen is currently working on the evaluation for the Alex Timpson Attachment and Trauma Programme in Schools, the Department for Education Innovation Programme Mockingbird Family Model Evaluation, and the Australian Open Adoptions Outcomes Study for Barnardos Australia with Professor Harriet Ward.

Helen has particular skills and expertise in children in care, social care processes, and local authority children’s services, and understanding the link between children’s needs, costs and outcomes. She is an integral member of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS) team, with detailed knowledge of the CCfCS tool itself, bottom-up costing methodology used to develop the unit costs for looked after children social care processes, and skilled in time-use data collection techniques. Helen also has an interest in mental health and well-being of children and young people including the impact, outcomes and costs of services in this area.

Mariela is conducting research on educational imaginaries and experiences of emptiness in rural villages that had permanent school closures (PI: Alis Oancea).

Prior to this role, she worked in the Rees Centre, where she conducted qualitative research on Innovation Programme Grants funded by the Department for Education (Lifelong Links and Staying Close projects).

She has a DPhil in Education and an MSt in International Human Rights Law from the University of Oxford. She has conducted research with hard-to-reach young people in different countries and has experience in policy and research. Voices from the Silent Cradles: Life Histories of Romania’s Looked-After Children is her latest book.

Valerie is a researcher at the Dept of Education’s Rees Centre.

She is working on a pilot study of STrAWB (Shared Training and Assessment for Well-Being), an innovative training and assessment package which aims to improve the mental health and well-being of children in care. Valerie developed the mental health aspect of STrAWB, with foster carers and clinicians while she was a Research Associate in Cambridge. Valerie’s interests are in young people’s mental health, particularly those in care. She has an interest in creative, participatory research approaches. She is co-founder of the Creative Research Collective.

Ellie is a Research Officer in the Rees Centre and is currently working with Dr Lisa Holmes on cost effectiveness of children’s services.

Her work on cost effectiveness involves devising and implementing time use studies, calculation of unit costs, and longitudinal analyses to assess the cost benefit/effectiveness of services. She is also engaged with a number of local authorities for their use of the Cost Calculator for Children’s Services (CCfCS). She is currently working on a project that investigates how economic value is conceptualised and justified in children’s social care.

Ellie has recently completed a PhD in Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) under the supervision of Professor Sir John Hills (Social Policy) and Professor Irini Moustaki (Statistics). In her PhD thesis, she examined the role of attitudes to long-term saving and the patterns of wealth accumulation among the younger half of the British working-age population.

Publications

(1) Suh, E. (In review) British adults entry to the housing market and the role of intergenerational transfers.
(2) Suh, E. (In review) Cant save or Wont Save: the interaction between attitudinal and socio-economic characteristics in retirement saving decision-making process among young British adults.
(3) Suh, E. (Working paper) Beyond the partial gender effect: Examining gender difference in additional retirement saving activity using multi-group analysis in SEM framework.
(4) Suh, E. (Working paper) Wealth Accumulation Patterns among young British adults.

Blog post for the Housing Studies Association (HSA)

Shirley is working on the evaluation of the Bright Spots project, which explores the subjective well-being of children in care. She is also working on the evaluation of Regional Adoption Agencies.

Shirley recently completed her thesis at Coventry University, on birth parents’ experiences of adoption from care, including their understanding of consent. She has also worked as a social worker in local authority children and family teams and voluntary agencies.

PUBLICATIONS

Lewis, S. and Brady, G. (2018) ‘Parenting Under Adversity: Birth Parents’ Accounts of Inequality and Adoption’. Social Sciences [online] 7 (12), 257. available from <http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/socsci7120257>

Priya is a Research Assistant in the Rees Centre, currently working on the ESRC funded Paired Reading RCT project.

She previously worked at Warwick Medical School,University of Warwick for 10 years where her work involved looking