Department of Education

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Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Joining the Department of Education in 2020 after teaching English and foreign languages in secondary schools and early years settings for 15 years, Catherine completed the MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition in 2021. Her doctoral research investigates the effectiveness of using songs as pedagogical tools with young second language learners in formal educational settings.

Additionally, Catherine hosts The Language Revolution podcast, exploring how linguistics and language awareness might inform/transform languages teaching with guests including Michael Rosen and David Crystal. She also project manages the annual conference for NALDIC, the national subject association for EAL.

Publications

Multilingual is Normal: An anthology of voices, talking about talking (2020)

In a broad sense, Shuo-Fang Liang’s areas of interest include applied phonetics/phonology and second language acquisition. As an Oxford-Taiwan Graduate Scholar, Shuo-Fang Liang is currently undertaking doctoral research in L2 speech perception.

Claire (郝煜) is a DPhil student in Applied Linguistics and a China Oxford Scholarship Fund (COSF) scholar.

Claire holds a BA in Education and Physics from the University of Cambridge, an MA in Applied Linguistics from UCL Institution of Education, and an EdM in International Education Policy from Harvard University. She is passionate about exploring and supporting the transnational experiences of bi-/multilingual students in studying abroad contexts. Her research and professional interests include bilingualism, language and identity, international education, professional development, and school leadership.

Since 2015, Claire has served as the Director of International Education at Beijing Xinxuedao Education Group, a non-profit organisation that operates 31 schools with over 30,000 K-12 students in China. She has also worked as a high school counsellor and a teacher of Physics and Psychology.

Publications

Hao, Y. and Lantsman, G. (2022). Motivation in MOOCs: a qualitative study on the design and evaluation of an online IELTS course. The 7th IAFOR International Conference on Education.

Hao, Y. (2020). Education without borders: sojourner trips in students’ holistic development. In Wang, J. (Ed.). Family, Society, and Education. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2020). Learning how to learn: the role of metacognition and self-regulation in learning. In Wang, J. (Ed.). The Virtue of Thinking in Learning. Tsinghua University Press.

Hao, Y. (2019). Chinese students at a UK university: how linguistic repertoire mediates language and sojourner identity construction. Linguistics and Applied Linguistics Conference. Beijing Normal University.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2018). Examining Linguistic Diversity as a Resource for Higher Education in the Anglophone World. In Tong, V. C., Standen, A., & Sotiriou, M. (Ed.). Shaping Higher Education with Students: Ways to Connect Research and Teaching (pp.288-293). UCL Press.

Preece, S., Griffin, A., Hao, Y. and Utemuratova, G. (2016). Making the most of linguistic diversity: the views and practices of bi/multilingual postgraduate students. The Multilingual University. ESRC Seminars.

Hao, Y. (2012). A Transformative Journey: China-US exchange student studying at an American high school. New World Press.

Nicole is a DPhil student at the Department of Education. Her research interests lie in statistical learning, orthographic learning, and language acquisition.

Before starting her DPhil at Oxford, Nicole completed her MSc in Developmental Linguistics at the University of Edinburgh. She then returned to Hong Kong to work as a lab manager and research assistant at the University of Hong Kong on a project that examines the relationship between theory of mind, executive functions and literacy in school-aged children with autism. Nicole’s experience has inspired her to continue her research on language acquisition. Ultimately, Nicole wishes to bring more positive impacts to children with special educational needs through her research on language acquisition.

Naosuke is a DPhil student whose research interests are Global Englishes and mutual intelligibility in English communication.

Naosuke finished an MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the University of Oxford with distinction in 2019. His DPhil research focuses on the intelligibility of non-native English speakers. Specifically, he would like to seek what kind of English pronunciation features are critical for successful English communication between non-native English speakers.

Siyang has a passion for languages and is interested in how study abroad benefits the vocabulary gains of international students in the UK.

She obtained a BA from Sun Yat-sen University in China and masters from the University of Cambridge and the University of Sydney, specializing in language education. She has taught English in a higher vocational college for a few years in China and has accumulated rich work experiences in the education sector. She was the winner of the Richard Pemberton Prize for the best postgraduate presentation at BAAL Annual Conference 2019.

Publications
  • Briggs Baffoe-Djan, J., & Zhou, S. (2020: in press). Close encounters of the third kind: quantity, type and quality of language contact during study abroad. In M. Howard (Ed.), Study Abroad and the Second Language Learner: Expectations, Experiences and Development. London: Bloomsbury.
  • Zhou, S. (2017). A longitudinal study of the English learning motivation of higher vocational students in Sino-foreign programs – A case study of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic. Journal of Educational Development, 613: 81-85.
  • Zhou, S. (2016). The implication of Dornyei’s motivation theory to the IELTS teaching for higher vocational college students. The Academic Journal of Guangdong Industry Polytechnic, 3: 49-52.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). A longitudinal study of the phrasal verb development of study-abroad students for one academic year. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference.
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Informal language contact and phrasal verb acquisition of study abroad students in the UK. Paper accepted by AILA World Congress, Groningen, Netherlands.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students. Paper presented at Second Language Research Forum, Lansing, US. 19-22 September.
  • Zhou, S. (2019). “You just picked it up.” The influence of informal language contact on the phrasal verb knowledge of international students in the UK. Paper presented at BAAL Annual Conference. Manchester, UK. 28-31 August.

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
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