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Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Yuanyue Hao obtained his BA degree in English (TESOL) in East China Normal University and MA degree in applied linguistics in Fudan University. Prior to his DPhil study, he taught TOEFL writing and EAP listening for Chinese learners of English.

His research involves interdisciplinary enquiries into applied linguistics and educational assessment, specifically language testing, adult second language speech, discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, global Englishes, natural language processing, and Rasch measurement. He is interested in the longitudinal attainment of L2 pronunciation of English by Chinese adult learners, analysed from the perspectives of many-facet Rasch model, phonetic analysis and natural language processing. His research tools include SPSS, R, Python, NVivo, Facets and RUMM.

Zhen graduated from China Foreign Affairs University in 2001 with a first-class honours degree in English, and obtained MSc in Child Development and Education in University of Oxford in 2014.

Before coming to Oxford, Zhen taught English in China or over 10 years. She also worked in 12 UK schools (11 primaries and 1 secondary school) for one year, teaching Chinese and Chinese culture. Her first-hand knowledge of Chinese and English education, combined with the training she received in Oxford, gives her an advantage to create her own voice in child learning, and in second language learning for young children.

Her research interests are children learning, literacy development, bilingualism, second language acquisition, English language teaching and learning.

Prior to her doctoral study, she has obtained a BA in English Language and Literature and BEc in Economics from Tsinghua University, China.

Afterwards, she has studied MPhil in Education on Research in Second Language Education in University of Cambridge. During her undergraduate and master’s study, she has researched various topics in applied linguistics, including motivation of study abroad, medical discourse use, perceptions of EFL courses and language proficiency, children’s early development in recognizing orthographical form of letters in L1, and teacher talk in EMI classes.

Because of the increasing number of EMI courses in universities in China and her learning experiences of taking EMI courses on several different subjects, Minhui has developed her research interest on this research context since her master’s study. Her master’s project was about the metadiscourse use in teacher talk in EMI classes in China’s universities. She is now trying to explore Chinese EMI students’ vocabulary learning in her doctoral research project. She wants to learn whether EMI classes can lead to vocabulary gain, whether students’ strategy using patterns change over time and whether there are any disciplinary differences in terms of the patterns of strategy use.

Research interests
  • Applied linguistics
  • Vocabulary learning
  • Language learning strategies
  • Metadiscourse
  • EMI
  • EAP
  • Academic discourse

Kedi is a doctoral student in Education, specialising in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition.

In 2017 she completed the Master’s in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition with distinction.

Her Master’s dissertation reported on an intervention study in which she taught a class of year 11 students skills and strategies in order to help them with speech stream segmentation in French.

Her doctoral studies builds on this work while taking advantage of her part-time status to study in detail the progress in listening of teenage English learners of French over three years.  She is taking a Complex Dynamic Systems perspective in order to examine the constantly changing relationships between listening comprehension proficiency and the factors which contribute to this, namely segmentation skills, lexical and syntactic knowledge, strategy use, and affect, as well as examining the pedagogical and social context of the learners.

As well as a doctoral student, she is a teacher of French, German and Spanish at a local comprehensive school in Oxford, where she also mentors for the modern languages Postgraduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

She is also a course tutor for Oxford’s distance MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (MSc ALLT). She studied French and German at the University of Bradford (1989-1993), before working as a journalist and editor in London. She also holds a diploma in adult education and educational assessment from the University of Bedfordshire (2007).

Research interests:

Second Language Acquisition, particularly second language listening. Decoding, sound-symbol correspondence, strategy use, self-efficacy in L2 listening; cross-linguistic influence as it relates to L2 listening.

Teacher education, particularly in modern languages.

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Faidra is a Departmental Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the University of Oxford. She teaches and supervises on the MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition and the MSc in Applied Linguistics for Language Teaching. Furthermore, she convenes the Applied Linguistics Seminar Series.

Faidra’s research focuses on the cognitive, educational and linguistic factors that underpin children’s acquisition of additional and/or foreign languages in (pre)school settings. She is also interested in exploring the use of theatre in language learning and teaching.

Faidra completed the DPhil in Education programme at the Department of Education. Her doctoral project examined the role of crosslinguistic influence in Greek child and adult learners’ acquisition of English, and was funded by the ESRC. Prior to joining the DPhil programme, Faidra obtained an MSc in Applied Linguistics & Second Language Acquisition from the University of Oxford and a BA in Linguistics from UCL. Moreover, she has a CELTA from UCL’s Centre for Languages and International Education, and has taught English to children and adults in various academic settings.

Faidra welcomes informal contacts from students interested in:

  • Various aspects of sequential bilingual and child L2 acquisition.
  • Crosslinguistic influence in (emergent) bilingual children.
  • Bilingual and foreign language education, with a focus on Early Years.
  • Exploring the potential of art for language learning and teaching.

Publications

Journal Articles

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (submitted, under review). Crosslinguistic transfer in preschool learners of English: Evidence from subject realisation.

Faitaki, F., Haase, A., Dimitriou, M. & Hessel, A.K.. (pre-registered, in preparation). Transfer effects in adult bilinguals’ processing and comprehension of multimorphemic words.

 Book Chapters

Faitaki, F., Hessel, A.K. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Vocabulary and grammar development in young learners of English as an Additional Language”, in M. Schwartz (Ed.). Handbook of Early Language Education (pp. 1-25). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (2020). “Oral elicitation tasks in language acquisition research”, in H. Rose and J. McKinley (Eds.). The Routledge Handbook of Research Methods in Applied Linguistics (pp. 360-369). London: Routledge.

 Conference Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “English language learning at Greek preschools: An opportunity or a challenge?”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (September 2021). “Climbing down from the Ivory Tower: Identifying priorities for EAL research that stakeholders actually need”. Paper presented at the BAAL 2021 Conference. Northumbria, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July 2021). “What is the role of crosslinguistic influence in English-Greek sequential bilingualism?”. Paper presented at the 30th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Barcelona, Spain.

Faitaki, F. (May 2021). “Adopting a multilingual mindset in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Paper presented at the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference. Oxford, UK.

Faitaki, F. (February 2021). “Greek children’s acquisition of English in monolingual and bilingual immersion preschools”. Poster presented at the BAAL Multilingualism SIG 2nd Annual Event. Westminster, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (June 2020). “The linguistic outcomes of Greek children learning English at preschool: Testing before and after lockdown”. Poster presented at the Conference on Multilingualism 2020. Reading, UK.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2019). “The role of linguistic proficiency, crosslinguistic transfer and exposure in Greek EAL children’s acquisition of English and Greek”. Paper presented at the 2nd Child Foreign/Second Language Learning Conference. Krakow, Poland.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy, V.A. (July, 2019). “Linguistic differences and crosslinguistic influence: the case of Greek children learning English as an Additional Language”. Poster presented at the Child Language Symposium 2019. Sheffield, UK.

Faitaki, F., Nation, K. & Murphy V.A. (September, 2018). “Investigating Crosslinguistic Influence in English-Greek Successive Bilinguals: Methodology in Practice”. Paper presented at the 28th EuroSLA Conference Doctoral Workshop. Münster, Germany.

Faitaki, F. & Murphy, V.A. (April, 2018). “English-Greek successive bilingual children’s production of subject pronouns”. Poster presented at the 14th Experimental Methods in Language Acquisition Research Workshop. Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Faitaki, F. (September, 2017). “The development of subject pronouns in Greek children learning English at preschool”. Paper presented at the 13th International Conference on Greek Linguistics. Westminster, UK.

 Edited Volumes

Tawell, A., Davison, K., Faitaki, F. & Oldaç, Y.I. (Eds.). (2019). Proceedings of the 2018 STORIES Conference. Department of Education, University of Oxford, Oxford: STORIES Conference.

 Proceedings Papers

Faitaki, F., Nation, K., & Murphy, V.A. (accepted, under review). “Immersion in the Early Years: The future of education and children’s key to success”. Proceedings of the 1st Yidan Prize Doctoral Conference.

 Reports

Chalmers, H., Faitaki, F., Murphy, V.A. (2021). Setting Research Priorities for English as an Additional Language: What do stakeholders want from EAL research?. British Association of Applied Linguistics.

Web Publications

Faitaki, F. (2021, May 6th). Using theatre to improve children’s communication skills: Reflections on the project and plans for the future. TORCH Blog.

Faitaki, F. (2018, April 16th). Becoming bilingual at preschool: Greek children’s acquisition of subject pronouns in English. EAL Journal.

Samuel is researching how immigrant and immigrant-origin students can better learn the majority language in urban settings, predominantly interested in the nexus among policy, practice, and internal factors that help/hinder language learning.

Samuel holds a Bachelor of Arts in English (First Class Honours) from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, a Bachelor of Education in English Language Education (First Class Honours) from the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and a Master of Science in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (Distinction) from the University of Oxford. His academic background demonstrates his long-standing interest in and commitment to language education and learning. Samuel has served as a secondary school teacher in underprivileged settings in Hong Kong for four years, which was when he taught immigrant and immigrant-origin students and became convinced that language education is a double-edged sword capable of either reproducing and sustaining inequalities, or promoting multiculturalism and a pluralistic society. He believes that, in an increasingly globalized world, equitable access to quality language education is the key to a better future for all. He is at present pursuing his doctorate at the Department of Education, University of Oxford.

His doctorate research, in particular, explores how language minority students of South and Southeast Asian descent learn Chinese as an additional language in Hong Kong. As a multi-level and multi-actor inquiry, his project aims to provide a holistic appraisal of the current language provision in terms of existing academic research (Phase 1: Systematic Scoping Review), policy and praxis (Phase 2: Empirical Policy Analysis), and phenomenological insights from students and Chinese teachers (Phase 3: Phenomenological Study).

Natsuno is a DPhil candidate in Education. She is at the last stage of completing her thesis. She has taught Japanese and English in universities in the U.S. and Japan for four years. In the U.S., she was in charge of teaching oral skills to Japanese language learners at all levels. In Japan, she taught university English courses: intermediate and advanced English and the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) preparation.

She studied her MSc in Applied Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition (ALSLA) at the University of Oxford, where she conducted her research on teachers’ and students’ beliefs and perceptions about teaching and learning English in Japanese higher education. Her findings were published in The Journal of Asia TEFL. Prior to coming to Oxford, she earned a master’s degree in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) in the U.S. and completed several Japanese language pedagogy courses in the U.S. and Japan to become a qualified English and Japanese teacher. She also conducted research on writing strategies of Japanese as a foreign language.

Her doctoral research focuses on Japanese students’ attitudes towards English as an international language. She is also interested in teachers’ and teacher educators’ attitudes towards English as an international language and Japanese as a second/foreign language. She was a research assistant for a project that investigated attainment gaps amongst Oxford undergraduates in highly mathematical subjects. For this she conducted a quantitative analysis on the collected data. She is currently a teaching assistant for ALSLA SPSS Statistics Lab.

Publications

Rose, H., Syrbe, M., Montakantiwong, A., & Funada, N. (in press). Global TESOL for the 21st century teaching English in a changing world. Clevedon, UK: Multilingual Matters.

Funada, N. (in press). Revisiting grammar translation: students’ beliefs about current classroom practices at Japanese universities. The Journal of AsiaTEFL, 17(1).

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (