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Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Learning: Higher Education at the Margins, delivering online education to refugee students in Kenya, Malawi, Thailand, and the Middle East. She also teaches International Development at undergraduate level with Oxford Summer Courses.

Lastly, as an ambassador for edSeedTM — a crowdfunding network for refugee higher education— Inga is presently working to promote the online platform in Rwanda.

Title of Thesis

Higher education for refugees within the Durable Solutions Framework: The case of Congolese refugees in Rwanda

Publications

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and educational assistance: History, theory, research. In G. Noblit (Ed.), Oxford research encyclopaedia of education. Oxford University Press.

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2018). The World Bank and education reform in Indonesia: Community-driven development, school-based management, and low-fee private schools. Privatization in Education Research Initiative.

Edwards Jr., D. B., Brehm, W.C. & Storen, I. (2018). The national politics of educational advocacy in the context of global governance: international funding and support for civil society engagement in Cambodia. Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education 48(2): 171-188

Edwards Jr., D. B. & Storen, I. (2017). Community-driven development and the changing nature of the World Bank’s impact in Indonesia. International Education Journal: Comparative Perspectives 16(3): 17-31

Storen, I. (2016). The shortcomings of vocational training in long-term refugee camps: Observations from Lebanon and Rwanda. NORRAG News 53, 72-74

 

Kamal Armanious is particularly interested in the topic of education governance to explore what is possible in developing an improved governance system for technical and vocational education and training (TVET).

There have always been various calls from different international organisations such UNESCO, ILO, World Bank, OECD etc. to develop a transformed and transformative approach to TVET. This is attractive for certain theoretical as well as practical reasons; however, one set of limitations in achieving this vision lies in the arena of governance. Mr Armanious examines an imagined better model of governance that can be developed from the principles of a new approach and wider theoretical resources with consideration to national realities where there may be very serious obstacles in the way of realising this new governance approach and hence the overall planned transformation.

Title of Thesis

Education and Training Policies in Egypt: Good Governance and Stakeholders Participation

 

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Natasha Robinson is an ESRC scholar, pursuing a DPhil in Education at Worcester College, Oxford.

Natasha’s research focuses on social cohesion and historical consciousness in post-apartheid South Africa, exploring the role of history curriculum and narrative in students’ understanding of structural privilege.

Previous to beginning her DPhil Natasha graduated from the London School of Economics with a BSc in Social Anthropology (2012), and from the University of Oxford with an MSc in Comparative and International Education (2015).

During her MSc she worked as a research assistant to Dr. David Johnson, conducting a preliminary evaluation of the DFID sponsored TESS-India teacher training program. The data she collected in this capacity included survey data of 1000 students and interviews with 53 teachers across 15 schools in Karnataka, and went on to form the basis of her dissertation on student-centered learning in India.

Over the past year Natasha has worked as a freelance researcher for a range of organizations including the University of Oxford, the OECD, the Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, JET Education, and Cape Peninsula University of Technology. Recent research projects have involved studies in India and Nigeria exploring the relationship between schooling and religious intolerance; a longitudinal study in Sierra Leone investigating the comparative learning outcomes of government and low-cost private schools; an analysis of South African Grade 9 textbooks exploring the representation of issues relating to social cohesion, as well as extensive work on teacher training and teacher professional standards.

She looks forward to developing as a researcher in the field of post-conflict education.

Title of Thesis

The development of historical consciousness in the post-apartheid history classroom

Publications
2018 Title: Preparing Our Youth For an Inclusive and Sustainable World: The OECD PISA global competence framework, Publisher: OECD
2016 Title: Engaging Teachers in Peace-Building in Post-Conflict Contexts: Evaluating Education Interventions in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for International Teacher Education
2016 Title: Global Review of Evidence of What Works in Preventing ICT-related Violence, Abuse and Exploitation of Children, and in Promoting Digital Citizenship, Publisher: Centre for Justice and Crime Prevention, Co-authors: Patrick Burton, Monica Bulger, Brian O’Neill
2016 Title: Violence Against Children in Schools; Synthesis Report, Publisher: UNICEF
2016 Title: Towards Teacher Professional Knowledge and Practice Standards in South Africa, Publisher: Centre for Economic Development, Co-Author: Nick Taylor
2015 Title: Teacher Ready! The State of Play in Initial Teacher Education Publisher: OECD
2015 Title: A successful residential food waste recycling program in urban apartments: An in-depth, multi-view analysis Journal: Journal of Cleaner Production
2012 Title: Female Education in the Age of One Child Families: An Ethnographic Approach   Conference: Xiamen International Conference on Education and Social Science

 

Lucy’s ESRC-funded doctoral research investigates how young refugees’ participation in upper-secondary level education in Greece can be promoted, by exploring the micro-, meso- and macro-level barriers and opportunities relating to the individual, their family and community and host society immigration and education policy.

Prior to coming to Oxford, she spent several years teaching, volunteering and advising across Europe, Asia and West Africa for UNESCO, NGOs, universities and governments. She has an MSc in Educational Studies from the University of Leuven, Belgium.

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Prior to arriving at Oxford, Brooks was a Member of Parliament in UK Government and Minister of Civil Society. Before entering politics Brooks was a Senior Partner at Apollo Management LP a leading Private Equity Firm.

Brooks was educated at Oxford University where he received an MSc in Education and Harvard University where he received a BA in History at Harvard College and an MBA in Finance at Harvard Business School.

Brooks founded an education charity in Rwanda ten years ago called A Partner in Education (www.apartnerineducation.org) and has built a school for 300 children and a teacher training centre in Kigali.

Brooks Masters dissertation focused on Fine Motor Proficiency in Seven Year Old Children in Rwanda as a predictor of academic achievement. His doctorate will be focusing on seeking to explore the drivers of education policy in Rwanda through the lens of politicians with a view to better understanding the formal and informal influences on policymaking.

Publications
  • Housing First: Housing-led Solutions to Rough Sleeping and Homelessness, Centre for Social Justice (2017);  The Hidden Debt Bombshell (CPS, 2009); The Price of Irresponsibility (CPS, 2008); Simply Red – The True State of the Public Finances (CPS, 2006) Direct Democracy – An Agenda for a New Model Party (2005).

Yousef’s doctoral research aims to map the protective factors and risk factors of educational resilience in unaccompanied refugee students using a mixed methods design.

For several years, Yousef has consulted in social policy data analysis and program evaluation for various NGOs, governments and UN agencies in the MENA region, East Africa, North America and Latin America. Prior to arriving to Oxford, he was an Education Pioneers Fellow in the US through which he worked as a Data Analytics & Compliance Manager for Boston Collegiate, a charter management organization in Boston.

Yousef holds a BA in International Studies from the American University of Sharjah (UAE), an MPA in International Security Policy from Columbia University (USA), and an EdM in Mind, Brain and Education from Harvard University (USA). He is passionate about promoting social justice education and improving diversity, equity and inclusion in social policy and practice.

Inga is a DPhil (PhD) Candidate in Comparative and International Education, with a research focus on higher education for refugees. Originally from Norway, she has spent over seven years teaching in Rwanda and Lebanon.

Prior to enrolling in the DPhil program, she earned her M.S. in Global and International Education from Drexel University (Pennsylvania, USA), and her B.A. in Biology from Truman State University (Missouri, USA).

Inga’s DPhil research focuses on the delivery of higher education in protracted refugee situations, with a particular focus on Rwanda. Through a mixed methods approach, the study seeks to evaluate the potential impact of refugee higher education within the framework of UN’s durable solutions for refugees: voluntary repatriation, local integration, and resettlement to a third country.

In addition to her doctoral work, Inga takes on educational research assignments, including with the International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO.

She continues to be involved in teaching, and was certified as an Associate Fellow of The Higher Education Academy at Oxford in 2016. She is an instructor in Human Rights/Women’s Rights at Jesuit Worldwide Le