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Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhstan during the internationalisation process in the social sciences and the humanities. Prior joining Oxford, Olga taught at University College London Institute of Education in London on the topics of migrant, refugee and minority education and European education traditions from a comparative lens.

Publications
  • Mun, O. (2020). ‘Epistemic Injustices in Internationalising Humanities and Social Sciences: A Case Study of Higher Education and Science Institutes in Kazakhstan.’ Centre for International Higher Education, Boston College. https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/lsoe/sites/cihe/publication/Perspectives/Perspectives%20No%2018.pdf
  • Mun, O. and Gafu, G. (in press) ‘University Research Capacity in Kazakhstan’. Higher School of Economics, Russia.
  • Kandiko Howson, C., Mun, O. and Walker, R. (2020). ‘Academic Activism in STEM fields: Discipline in Theory and Practice.’ Philosophy and Theory of Higher Education Society.
  • Aizuddin M., Habibi A., Mun, O. (in press, 2020). ‘Post-Colonialism in Comparative and International Education.’ In Jules, T., Shields, R., Thomas, M. (Ed.), Bloomsbury Handbook of Theory in Comparative and International Education.
  • Palandjian, G., Silova, I., Mun, O., Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2018). ‘Gender and Nation in Postsocialist Educational Transformations.’ In Silova, I., & Chankseliani, M. (Eds.), Comparing Post-Socialist Transformations: Education in Eastern Europe and Former Soviet Union. Oxford: Symposium Books.
  • Mun, O., & Zholdashaliyeva, R. (2017). ‘Alippe, Bukvar’ and Gender: A comparative analysis of early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan.’ In E. Brown & R. Craven & G. McLean (Ed.), International Advances in Education: Global Initiatives for Equity and Social Justice Series. Information Age Publishing
  • Patel, K. and Mun, O. (2017). ‘Marketing ‘development’ in the neoliberal university.’ DPU Working Papers https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/development/case-studies/2017/sep/marketing-development-neoliberal-university
  • Fimyar, O., Saniyazova, A. & Mun, O. (2017) ‘Methodology of Collaborative Research: Or, Searching for a Synergy in the Study of Student Transition in Kazakhstan.’ In SAGE Research Methods Cases. London, United Kingdom: SAGE Publications.
  • Mun, O. (2015). ‘(Re)imagining national identity through early literacy textbooks in Kazakhstan’, Forum of Young Central Asian Experts, 2nd edition. http://caa-network.org/archives/5620
  • Silova, I., Mead Yaqub, M., Mun, O., Palandjian, G. (2014). ‘Pedagogies of Space: (re)imagining nation and childhood in post-Soviet states.’ Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 195-209.
  • Silova, I., Brezhenyuk, V., Kudasova, M., Mun, O., Artemev, N. (2014). ‘Youth Protests against Privatisation of Education in post-Soviet states.’ European Education, 46(3), 56-65.

Lynn Schneider is a DPhil student at the University of Oxford. Her research focusses on education policy, especially in the field of higher education.

Her previous research explored Syrian refugees’ experiences of accessing higher education in Germany. Her DPhil is concerned with examining British universities’ response to the legal framework of counter-terrorism legislation and the broader political discourse of ‘radicalisation’. Here, she qualitatively explores the ways in which UK universities are translating the Prevent Legislation of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act into higher education policies and practices. More broadly, the project contributes to interdisciplinary understanding of the changing relationship between universities and the state, and its implications for the visions and values on which higher education governance and management are based.

Prior to pursuing the DPhil in Education, Lynn graduated with distinction from the Oxford MSc in Comparative and International Education. She also holds a double degree in German Literature and Language and Education from the University of Cologne. Lynn conducts tutorials in Comparative and International Education and Environmental Education. She has also worked as a research assistant for the Foundation for UNESCO – Education for Children in Need, as a language instructor for refugees and asylum seekers in Germany, and as a pre-school teacher and educator in Palestine and Germany.

Publications

Schneider, L (2018): Access and Aspirations: Syrian Refugees’ Experiences of Entering Higher Education in Germany. Research in Comparative and International Education, 13(3), pp 457-478 https://doi.org/10.1177/1745499918784764

Kojo is a DPhil student from Ghana, researching on Access to Higher Education (HE) for Rural, Low Socio-Economic Status (Low SES) Youth in Ghana.

He is also co-founder of University Avenue, an Education Consultancy specialising in University Application Counselling for Students from Ghana.

His research looks at the disparities in Access to HE, and the exclusion of Rural Low SES Youth in HE, by highlighting barriers faced and support structures provided by various stakeholders – family, friends, community networks, local politicians, government and government policies. He delineates access into various stages or “Milestones of Access,” as I call them, in order to provide a close focus on the needs of Rural Youth at each milestone or stage, until they successfully make it to the final milestone of “full access.”

Some theoretical underpinnings of my research so far include Equality of Opportunity (Roemer), Meritocracy and Affirmative Action in HE Access (McCowan), Capabilities Approach (Sen), and Distributive and Procedural Justice (Rawls).

His aim by the end of this project is to have a very clear elicitation of who the most important stakeholders and networks are, and what the barriers and support structures they provide for HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth are. This project should influence our conception of the journey to HE Access by Rural Low SES Youth and point to areas of urgent intervention at each Milestone of Access.

Soyoung Lee is a DPhil student in education and a Clarendon scholar at University of Oxford. She is also a member of Higher Education research group at the Department of Education.

Soyoung’s research interests are focused on international higher education as self-formation as well as cultural foundations of university students’ learning patterns. She applies an integrated framework from educational psychology, philosophy and sociology that forms the current self-formation discourse in global higher education. Her doctoral research is fully funded by University of Oxford (Clarendon Scholarship and Oxford-Sir John Swire & Rosemary Foot Graduate Scholarship) and supervised by Professor Simon Marginson and Professor Steven Puttick.

Prior to the DPhil, Soyoung completed her MPhil in Educational Research at University of Cambridge, where she graduated with Distinction. In her master’s thesis, Soyoung investigated how and why international students’ learning patterns formed in their home countries change during their adaptation processes in British higher education, under the guidance of Professor Jan Vermunt. Her research was supported by International Cambridge University Student Union (iCUSU) and awarded the Best Dissertation Award.

Back in South Korea, Soyoung worked as an educational programme developer and instructor at Youth Leadership Centre and participated in a number of projects, collaborating with various Korean universities, schools, and NGOs like Red Cross Youth. She also attended to Kyunghee University in Seoul, where she received BA degree in Hospitality management.

Publications
  • Lee, S. Y. (2018). International students’ learning patterns and their academic adaptation in British higher education [Master dissertation]. University of Cambridge, the United Kingdom.
  • Fryer, Lee, & Shum. (2020). Student Learning, Development, Engagement, and Motivation in Higher Education. In H. Anne (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies in Education. New York: Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/OBO/9780199756810-0246
  • Lee, S. Alina Schartner, Tony J. Young: Intercultural transitions in higher education: international student adjustment and adaptation. Higher Education (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00618-y

Sihan is a DPhil candidate fully funded by the Swire Scholarship at Department of Education, where she investigates self-regulated listening of students in an EMI transnational university in China.

Before her DPhil, Sihan worked as KTP (Knowledge Transfer Partnership) Associate at University of Edinburgh. Sihan was Educational Lead of the ’Tornado English’ project – a digital English platform for Chinese young learners, using bilingual animation and digital games for teaching. Sihan has also been awarded a Distinction by the University of Cambridge on an MPhil in Research in Second Language Education in 2016.

Publications
  • Zhou, S. & Rose, H. (Forthcoming). English Medium Instruction in Mainland China: National trends, and institutional developments In J. McKinley & N. Galloway (Eds). English-Medium Instruction Practices in Higher Education: International Perspectives. Bloomsbury.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Xu, X., & Zhou, S. (2019). Investigating policy and implementation of English medium instruction in higher education institutions in China. British Council.
  • Rose, H., McKinley, J., Zhou, S. & Xu, X. (2019). English-medium instruction (EMI) policy implementation in universities in China. In S. Bullock. (Ed.). 2019 International Symposium on EMI for Higher Education in the New Era: Selected Proceedings (pp. 54-59). London: British Council.
  • Zhou, S. (2014). The effects of dramatisation on English literature comprehension. Journal of Overseas English, 17, 235-236.
Conferences
  • Zhou, S. (2020). Learning to swim: Year one students’ self-regulated listening in an English-medium transnational university in China. Paper accepted at AAAL Annual Conference 2020.
  • Zhou, S. & Perrin, S. (2020). To sink or to swim: Self-regulated listening in English-medium-instruction (EMI) universities in China. Paper accepted at AILA World Congress, Groningen.
  • Zhou, S., Li., C., Galloway, N., & Rennie, R. (2018). Attitudes towards Digital Game-Based Learning of Chinese Primary School English Teachers. Paper presented at the International Conference of Innovation in Language Learning, Florence.
  • Zhou, S., Rennie. R., & Galloway, N. (2017). Digital game-mediated second language education: Viewing from teachers’ perspectives. Paper presented at International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies, Barcelona.

Arzhia Habibi is a DPhil in Education Candidate and uses Mandarin to conduct her research in the Chinese higher education context.

Arzhia’s research focuses on ‘expressions’ of global or world citizenship education in a Chinese higher education institution In the study, she explores the perspectives and practices of educators and students at a China-based university, which experiments with discourses related to citizenship. She further investigates how individual, local, national and global dynamics and the surrounding discourses influence worldviews and practices in a university setting.

As empirical studies on global or world citizenship education in the Chinese context are scarce, Arzhia hopes to contribute to a nascent knowledge base which may extend and add depth to the critical global discourses of global and world citizenship education, beyond Eurocentric framings.

Prior to her studies at Oxford, Arzhia received a first class Bachelor’s degree in Contemporary Chinese Studies at The University of Nottingham, and a Master’s in International Communication in Taiwan at National Chengchi University. As a child, she also attended kindergarten in Fuzhou, Fujian province of China.

Lili is currently reading for DPhil in Education at Oxford University funded by Departmental Studentship. Previously, Lili obtained her B.A in Public Administration from Minzu University of China (with first-class honour), and M.A in Public Administration (Education Economics and Policy) from Tsinghua University (China).

Before transferring to Oxford with her supervisor, Lili was enrolled as a PhD student at University College London-Institute of Education (ESRC and IOE-funded) and spent eight months studying at the University of Hong Kong (supported by ESRC-OIV scheme) as an exchange student.

In Lili’s doctoral thesis, she explores the similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education. By conceptually comparing and combining the notion of “public” and related key terms, the research attempts to establish synergies between the two traditions, and to derive a more generic and comprehensive understanding of public goods in higher education, albeit with space for continuing diversity. To give the two traditions equal status and enhance mutual understanding, the research also provides a lexical basis for building bridges between the two traditions through reviewing the works of scholarship in political theory in each tradition. Lili’s doctoral research is potentially path-breaking. It is likely to attract scholarly attention on a global basis and interest policy makers and university leaders in China, the UK and elsewhere.

Lili has been involved in numerous research projects focusing on higher education policies and governance. Broadly, Lili’s research interests include higher education policy, political philosophy and international higher education.

Lili is also working as a PhD researcher at the ESRC/OFSRE-funded Centre for Global Higher Education on the Project 1.1–Local and global public good contributions of higher education: a comparative study in six national systems.

For more details, please check Lili’s personal website.

Title of Thesis

Similarities and differences between notions of “public” in Sinic and Anglo-American traditions, and its implications in higher education

Publications

Yang, L. (2017) ‘The Public Role of Higher Learning in Imperial China’, Centre for Global Higher Education Working papers, No. 28, London: UCL Institute of Education (Published working paper)

 

Tom is a doctoral student working in the Centre for Global Higher Education and a pre-doctoral fellow at the Research Institute for Higher Education, Hiroshima University.

A graduate of the department’s MSc Comparative and International Education course, he focuses on the global landscape of higher education, with a particular focus on the mobile populations inherent to the internationalisation of tertiary education. Having studied and worked in both the UK and Japan, Tom’s research is often engaged with international flows of students and staff in these contexts.

Tom’s doctoral research seeks to explore the education-migration nexus from the perspective of graduating international students. This longitudinal qualitative study hopes to provide new insight into the emergence of migrant intentions among international students, and to provide the basis for new theorisations of dynamic student-migrant identities through post-graduation transitions.

He also works on a number of additional projects, including the Centre for Global Higher Education’s project 1.2: “Internationalisation of HE as a public good: a comparative study in four national systems”. Tom is also collaborating with colleagues in Japan on a qualitative study with junior international faculty in Japan, seeking to understand their professional trajectories within Japanese higher education and their role in the ongoing process of internationalisation.

Title of Thesis

Considering agency in the education-migration nexus: A temporal analysis of structure-agency with student-migrants

 

Xiujuan is currently pursuing a DPhil in Education, researching students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market.

Her current research interests are centred on exploring the relationships between educational attainment, skills acquisition and labour market outcomes, alongside the economics of education and international education. She is a Kellogg Scholar and a Chevening Scholar.

Alongside her studies, Xiujuan works as a project team leader at the University of the West of England’s Employability and Enterprise Department. She has previously worked at the University of Bristol’s Careers Service and as a manager and English teacher at New Channel Education Group. She is an AGCAS Postgraduate Taught Task Group member. She was also an Advisory Group member for a Universities UK international (UUKi) research project titled “What do international graduates do?”

Xiujuan was raised in Xinjiang, China and completed her undergraduate studies in Beijing. In 2013 she completed a Master of Education course at the University of Bristol.

Thesis Title

Mapping Masters students’ transition from UK universities to the global labour market: a two-part exploration

Publications

Olga is a co-convenor of the Philosophy of Education Reading Group at the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. Olga’s main research interest is in the topics of epistemic injustice across all levels of education and across national borders with a focus on higher education and the process of knowledge production in academic institutes and universities. Her core interest lies between the areas of social epistemology, research on research (RoR) and comparative and international education (CIE). She has been a recipient of multiple research awards in the United States and the United Kingdom and is an elected co-convenor of the Comparative and International Education Special Interest Group at the British Educational Research Association (BERA).

Her new research at Oxford will explore the epistemically just and unjust practices as experienced by scholars from Kazakhst