Department of Education

Viewing archives for Student

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my DPhil, I was a research officer at KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research programme, supervised by Prof Mike English (Nuffield Department of Medicine, Oxford University) working on the intersection of health systems strengthening and governance (specifically looking at quality of paediatric care), health informatics, and contemporary debates on health capacity strengthening vis-à-vis social epidemiology. I have been recognised for my work in the field of health informatics and social epidemiology with awards and grants from the Wellcome Trust and UNESCO’s Institute of Lifelong Learning.

Dr Laura Larke is a social theorist using qualitative methods to explore digital learning practices and computing education policy.

Her research interests centre on the interplay between education, socio-cultural structures, and technology, with a particular interest in European educational policies aimed at preparing young people for participation in an increasingly digitalised world. Dr Larke holds a BA in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Cruz, as well as an MSc in Education (Learning & Technology) and DPhil in Education from the University of Oxford. Prior to moving to the UK, Dr Larke worked for several years in education technology research in the Silicon Valley.

James works with Professor Niall Winters, Dr. Chris Paton, and the Learning and New Technologies group.

His research interests focus on the use of mobile technologies to train health workers in low- and middle-income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. He is particularly interested in the role of mobile technologies (mHealth) for the supportive supervision of Community Health Workers (CHWs).

His thesis will focus on the design, delivery and evaluation of a mobile based supervision platform for CHWs in rural Uganda.

Prior to commencing the DPhil, James was a medical doctor based in Cambridge, with a specific interest in Global Health. He has previously spent time working in Uganda and Kenya with various NGOs and was Kennedy Scholar at Harvard University working with Dr. Thomas Burke at the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Global Health and Human Rights, as well as a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University Center for Health Education.

He has been recognised for his work in the field of mHealth with awards and grants from The Royal Society of Medicine, The Velji Foundation, The Oxford Centre for Comparative and International Education and The British Medical Association.

He is always happy to connect with others working in the field and has active collaborations with University of Cambridge, New York University, Makerere University, Columbia University, and The World Health Organization.”

Academic prizes
  • Oxford University Scholarship in Comparative and International Education 2018

Karim’s current doctoral research aims to further our understanding of learners’ learning ecologies.

An individual’s learning ecology is conceptualized as his network of social and material resources along with the relationships between these resources. Social resources include parents, siblings, and peers, amongst other personal connections. Distributed resources, on the other hand, are all non-human resources, and they include software, hardware, and books amongst a variety of other media content. Relationships between specific social and distributed resources exist when a friend or a book refers to another article or book, or one a parent or sibling brokers an interaction with an expert on a topic.

A learning ecology can be resource rich or poor, diverse or homogenous, and fragmented or interdependent. Considering a learning ecology an ego-network, social network analysis techniques, including network density and prevalence of dyads and triads, will be used to explore these attributes.

Karim has designed and developed a mobile application to collect data about the learning resources involved in sample learning instances. Learmapp, a learning diary mobile App, currently on Andriod’s PlayStore, aims to help its users track their learning, understand their learning ecologies and become better learners.

Karim is Co-founder of Mirqah, a learning and development company based in Cairo, Egypt. Working for Mirqah, Karim has trained people from top managers, to heads of departments, to supervisory and staff levels. Karim has designed and managed the design of a multitude of learning experiences ranging in diversity from company-wide leadership development and innovation programs, to business simulations, games, and online learning platforms.

Karim is also Co-founder and Chairman of Kalimaat Foundation. Kalimaat, also based in Cairo, Egypt, is currently designing, testing and will be eventually scaling an innovative pre-school curriculum in the Arab region and the Islamic world.

Supervisor

Dr Niall Winters

Research interests
  • Learning ecologies
  • Learning science
  • Educational technology
  • Early childhood education
  • Informal learning
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Self-tracked and quantified-self

Imogen works as Director of Learning for LEO, a learning technologies company, where she undertakes research, consultancy and design for LEO’s clients.

Imogen has designed solutions for tablets and smartphones and led the team that won gold for ‘Best Use of Mobile Learning’ at the E-Learning Awards in 2012.

Imogen is currently studying part-time for a Doctorate in Education with a focus on the use of mobile technology. She is researching the potential of mobile phones to support adult learners undertaking professional development in workplace contexts.

Tiarnach’s research is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.

Tiarnach has returned to the Department of Education having previously completed an M.Sc in Childhood Development and Education at the University of Oxford. Tiarnach was recipient of the Oxford Review of Education Dissertation Prize 2016/2017 for his thesis exploring the effects of feedback in virtual learning environments. He completed his undergraduate, Honours B.Ed at Trinity College Dublin.

Tiarnach’s professional background is in primary education as a mainstream and English language teacher, working predominantly in disadvantaged communities.

Research interests:

  • Technology in education
  • Early literacy and numeracy learning
  • Motivation
  • Assessment
  • Early mental health
  • Effects of social disadvantage on education
  • Quantitative methods in education research

Fiona Jelley is a DPhil student in the Child Development and Learning (CDL) research group. Her doctoral work focuses on children’s early numeracy development and is funded by a LiFT project studentship.

The aim of Fiona’s doctoral research is to investigate the possible causal relationships between core numeracy skills (e.g. number knowledge) and arithmetic. Her broader research interests include evaluations of interventions designed to enhance young children’s development, parental involvement in children’s education, and investigating the way technology can be used in supporting children’s learning.

Before joining the Department, Fiona gained a first-class honours degree in Psychology from The University of Bath. Since then, she has worked in a variety of research roles at the Department, most recently as a senior researcher on the LiFT project, exploring the potential of digital technology in parental engagement. She has been involved in various other parental engagement projects, often involving evaluations through randomised controlled trials. She was also part of a team working with Oxford University Press on new and innovative ways that technology can support young children’s reading.

Erin is a doctoral student in Education, researching the development of new technologies through interdisciplinary practices.

She is funded by the Economic and Social Sciences Research Council (ESRC) and the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).

Alongside her studies, Erin writes for the International Institute of Educational Planning (IIEP) at UNESCO, and she has recently completed an appointment as an H-STAR Visiting Researcher at Stanford University, hosted by Prof. Roy Pea. Prior to her doctoral studies, Erin was awarded a distinction for the MSc in Education (Learning and Technology) at Oxford, and was a Research Assistant at the Oxford Internet Institute.

She completed a BA (Hons) in Classics at the University of Cambridge, during which time she was Vice-President of her Junior Common Room and also worked for the Admissions Office in Educational Outreach. Erin holds a PGC in International Business Administration and Practice, and between her periods of study she worked for Thomas Reuters in New York City and Kantar (WPP) in London. Erin has earned scholarships to study at the British Schools of Athens and Rome, and she is fluent in Latin and Ancient Greek.

She is very interested in entrepreneurship, and in her spare time she practices Ballet and yoga. Erin’s current research interests include Science and Technology Studies (STS), interdisciplinarity, sociology of technology, Science of Team Science (SciTS), knowledge transfer, emerging technologies and Higher Education policy.

Publications

Hajikhani, Young, Wilmot, Alexanyan, and Russell (2018). University-Industry Programs as Platforms: A Case Study of Multi-Disciplinary Collaborative Network Development. (HICSS2018), January 2018, Hawaii, USA.

Young (2016). An investigation of technology mediation in interdisciplinary research within Higher Education. Networked Learning Conference (NLC2016), May 2016, Lancaster University, UK.

My research aims to understand the learning experiences of clinicians with no or limited emergency care training opportunities and using LIFE platform (www.oxlifeproject.org) focus on how, by leveraging adaptive feedback mechanisms, it can be designed to deliver context-relevant ‘intelligent’ training to health-workers in low resource settings.

My research interests are in Global Health and Social Epidemiology, Maternal and New-born health in low-income countries and Data Science.

Prior to starting my D